Tag Archives: Study

ARAG Study Reports Seven Out of 10 Employees Suffer Personal Legal Woes

Des Moines, Iowa (PRWEB) April 1, 2008

An alarming number of U.S. employees spend valuable time during their work days dealing with more than just regular job duties. For many workers, their family, financial, home or automobile legal woes compete for time and attention – resulting in lower job performance, productivity and morale.

“Workplace effectiveness often drops when employees are preoccupied with legal and financial concerns,” says Cameron Sutton, President and Chief Executive Officer, ARAG (http://ARAGgroup.com)]. “The impact, the frequency and the complexity of legal woes can adversely affect employees and the organizations for which they work.”

A recent ARAG-commissioned study measured the impact of employee legal woes, the use of legal services and employee attitude toward legal services. The study, entitled “Measuring the Effects of Employee Financial & Legal Woes,” was conducted by Russell Research, which interviewed more than 1,000 full-time employees, representing a nationwide, demographically-dispersed base.

Among the key results of the ARAG Legal Woes study:

Seven out of 10 surveyed employees experienced one or more legal woes during a 12-month period.

They spent, on average, 57 hours while at work, dealing with legal woes.

Four of 10 employees said legal woes had a negative impact on work performance (focus, stress, efficiency or effectiveness on the job).

The most common legal woes involved issues of family care, credit trouble, child custody, consumer fraud, home or automobile purchase or repair and estate planning.

According to Sutton, “People have traditionally invested in life, health, automobile and home insurance to achieve security and peace of mind. They are becoming increasingly aware of the risks that legal woes represent in their personal and work lives.”

The Legal Woes Study indicated that one out of eight employees worked for an employer that offers legal plans at work while seven out of 10 said they believe legal plans would be useful in resolving personal legal needs.

Because legal woes take a heavy toll on workplace productivity and can affect business profitability, Sutton stated that concerned employers are looking for effective ways to address this issue and many are considering the addition of legal plans to their benefit packages.

For further information about the ARAG study on “Measuring the Effects of Employee Financial & Legal Woes,” contact Media(at)ARAGgroup.com. ARAG is a global leader of legal insurance. The company has an international premium base of more than $ 1.75 billion and protects 15 million individuals and their families – worldwide. ARAG offers comprehensive legal plans that provide a clear path for resolving legal issues. This enables people to protect their families, finances and futures.

This press release was distributed through eMediawire by Human Resources Marketer (HR Marketer: http://www.HRmarketer.com) on behalf of the company

listed above.

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New Study: Americans Say Recession, Declining Stocks and Soft Home Values Less Financially Disastrous Than Death of Spouse


Windsor, Conn. (Vocus) May 15, 2008

While current headlines and political rhetoric focus on the publics fears of broad financial challenges such as economic recession and Social Security going broke, Americans in every demographic group say that their death or the death of their spouse would be a much greater threat to their familys future financial situation, according to a new survey from ING, one of the nations leading financial services and life insurance companies.

The new survey further clarifies the savings and wealth protection needs of Americans. The insight into consumers perceptions about their financial future and the wide-ranging reasons for saving money and having adequate life insurance may even seem contrary to popular assumptions about people and their money, said Catherine Smith, CEO, ING U.S. Insurance. The wide-ranging survey by Ipsos Public Affairs of more than 1,000 adults revealed Americans contemporary attitudes and thinking on protecting their financial future and on life insurance, traditionally part of working peoples financial plan.

The survey demonstrates the central role life insurance plays in a comprehensive financial plan, including the important role of wealth protection. Financial-planning experts say that inadequate life insurance can be swiftly disastrous to families that dont properly anticipate and assess the impact death of a spouse or partner can have on short- and long-term finances.

As Baby Boomers financial needs have evolved, we see the heightened importance of risk protection combined with wealth creation, Smith said. Insurance products can help provide an important protective wrapper around retirement savings. This insurance wrapper effectively manages a diversity of risks and allows consumers to enter their retirement years with more confidence. Bottom line life insurance has become the forgotten foundation of a long-term, comprehensive financial plan.

Among the most interesting findings of the survey:

GLSEN Study Finds Nearly 9 out of 10 LGBT Students Experience Harassment


New York, NY (Vocus) October 8, 2008

GLSEN, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, today released the most comprehensive report ever on the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students, The 2007 National School Climate Survey. The report is being released in conjunction with the announcement that GLSEN will partner with the Ad Council on a multiyear national public education campaign targeting anti-LGBT language among teenagers.

The survey of 6,209 middle and high school students found that nearly 9 out of 10 LGBT students (86.2%) experienced harassment at school in the past year, three-fifths (60.8%) felt unsafe at school because of their sexual orientation and about a third (32.7%) skipped a day of school in the past month because of feeling unsafe.

“The 2007 National School Climate Survey reveals that, on a whole, the situation is still dire for many LGBT youth when it comes to school safety,” GLSEN Executive Director Kevin Jennings said. “It’s hard to believe that anyone who reads this report could continue to turn the other way as our nation’s LGBT students are bullied and harassed at alarming rates. The good news is there’s hope. The 2007 National School Climate Survey also shows that when schools and educators take action, they can make a drastic difference.”

Key Findings of The 2007 National School Climate Survey include:

A Hostile School Climate and the Effects on Academic Achievement:

Allstate Insurance Company Holiday Teen Driving Hotspots Study Reveals Areas with Highest Rates of Deadly Teen Crashes from Thanksgiving through New Year’s Day : Study part of Home for the Holidays teen safe driving campaign to urge parents and teens to have a conversation about smart driving during the holiday season and sign Allstate’s Parent-Teen Driving Contract


NORTHBROOK, Ill. (PRWEB) December 3, 2008

The Allstate Holiday Teen Driving Hotspots Study found that the 10 deadliest hotspots for fatal teen crashes among the nation’s 50 largest metro areas (a central city and its surrounding counties) from Thanksgiving through New Year’s Day are:

New Easter Seals/MassMutual Study: Autism Strains Family Finances, Threatens Long-Term Care and Security

Springfield, Mass. (Vocus) December 16, 2008

Caring for children with autism is wreaking havoc on family finances across America, jeopardizing current and long-term care and security, according to a new study, Living with Autism, released today by Easter Seals and Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual).

“No one expected the problems and challenges to be so severe for families living with autism – the numbers are stark and point to the pervasiveness of this public health crisis,” said John Chandler, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of MassMutual’s U.S. Insurance Group. “The study reveals that many families are exposed to serious financial risk due to a lack of awareness and planning.”

For example, of parents having children with autism:

74 percent fear their children will not have enough financial support after the parents die (compared to only 18 percent of parents with typically developing children)
52 percent say caring for their child drains the family’s current financial resources (compared to 13 percent)
47 percent say the cost of care financially impacts how they raise typically developing siblings

“The good news is that, with increased awareness and the right help, this is one piece of the autism puzzle that parents can begin to solve,” added Chandler.

“There’s a lot at stake,” said Joanne Gruszkos, director of the SpecialCareSM Program at MassMutual. “By not addressing financial and life care planning needs, or addressing them with inexperienced professionals, a lot of these families could, at the very least, risk losing the government services that are a real lifeline for children with autism.”

The study found that despite overwhelming need, most parents don’t seek out the help of skilled financial professionals for a variety of reasons, including lack of time, not knowing where to start, and simply being overwhelmed. “Even when they do reach out, the help can be misguided because it comes from financial professionals who are not trained specifically to deal with complex cases involving special needs,” added Gruszkos. “Run-of-the-mill planning can backfire.”

The study found that:

only half of families surveyed receive professional financial advice
only 38 percent have designated a guardian
only 17 percent have created a Special Needs Trust, which can be an important funding vehicle
only 24 percent have identified living arrangements, if the parent is no longer living
MassMutual’s SpecialCare program is an innovative outreach initiative developed exclusively by MassMutual to provide access to information, specialists, and financial products and services that can help improve the quality of life for people with disabilities and other special needs and their families and caregivers.

“Life care planning is a growing area of financial services need, as awareness and occurrence of disabilities and special needs increases across the country,” explained Gruszkos. “MassMutual has more than 200 Special Care Planners across the U.S. who have received advanced training in estate and tax planning concepts, special needs trusts, government programs, and the emotional dynamics of working with special needs families and caregivers,” she added.

“There is an urgent need for increased funding and services – especially for adults with autism. Easter Seals and MassMutual want to help change all of this and make a difference for families living with autism today,” concluded Patricia Wright, Ph.D., MPH, Easter Seals’ national director, autism services.

Results of the study are available at http://www.massmutual.com/autism. A variety of resources from MassMutual for people with special needs, their families and caregivers are available at http://www.massmutual.com/specialcare/resources.

Editors please note: Photos available.

Survey Methodology

The Living with Autism Study – a survey of more than 2,500 parents about their children’s daily lives, relationships, independence, education, housing, employment, finances and healthcare – highlights the pervasive emotional, practical and financial impacts of autism on families, their futures and their finances.

The study was conducted online within the United States by HarrisInteractive on behalf of Easter Seals between June 16 and July 17, 2008 among 1,652 parents of children age 30 and under who have autism and 917 parents of typically developing children age 30 and under. No estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated; a full methodology is available.

About MassMutual

MassMutual is a leader in helping people with disabilities and other special needs and their families through its exclusive SpecialCareSM Program. For more information and resources on autism, go to http://www.massmutual.com/autism.

MassMutual Financial Group is a marketing name for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual) and its affiliated companies and sales representatives. MassMutual and its subsidiaries had more than $ 500 billion in assets under management at year-end 2007. Assets under management include assets and certain external investment funds managed by MassMutual’s subsidiaries.

Founded in 1851, MassMutual is a mutually owned financial protection, accumulation and income management company headquartered in Springfield, Mass. MassMutual’s major affiliates include: OppenheimerFunds, Inc.; Babson Capital Management LLC; Baring Asset Management Limited; Cornerstone Real Estate Advisers LLC; The First Mercantile Trust Company; MML Investors Services, Inc., member FINRA and SIPC (http://www.finra.org and http://www.sipc.org); MassMutual International LLC and The MassMutual Trust Company, FSB.

About Easter Seals

Autism is a lifelong disability that affects the way a person’s brain functions, involving challenges in communication, social skills, and behaviors. While there is no known cause or cure, autism is treatable and people with autism can – and do – lead meaningful lives. Easter Seals is the leading non-profit provider of services for individuals with autism, developmental disabilities, physical disabilities and other special needs. For nearly 90 years, we have been offering help and hope to children and adults living with disabilities, and to the families who love them. Through therapy, training, education and support services, Easter Seals creates life-changing solutions so that people with disabilities can live, learn, work and play. Visit http://www.easterseals.com or http://www.actforautism.org to learn more about autism, find services at an Easter Seals near you, or help change the lives of people living with autism by becoming a donor or volunteer.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Telebriefing: National Children’s Study Recruitment Begins

Washington, DC (Vocus) January 7, 2009



What: A media telephone briefing and webcast to announce the beginning of enrollment in the National Children’s Study.

The largest child health study in the United States, the National Children’s Study will follow 100,000 children from before birth to age 21 to identify genetic and environmental factors that contribute to health disorders and conditions of childhood and adulthood.

The study is led by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences–both of the National Institutes of Health–the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Who: Speakers are:

Dr. Duane Alexander, Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Dr. Peter Scheidt, Director, National Children’s Study
Dr. Barbara Entwisle, Principal Investigator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Dr. Philip Landrigan, Principal Investigator, Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York
Why: The speakers will describe initiation of efforts to enroll participants in Duplin County, North Carolina, and Queens, New York, for the initial phase of the National Children’s Study.

When: Tuesday, January 13, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time

Members of the media only may dial into the telebriefing at 1-888-727-6732. The Participant Code is 884544. The briefing will begin promptly at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time.

Members of the media only also may log on to the Web cast of the briefing at https://webmeeting.nih.gov/ncs011309/ . On the first screen, sign on as “guest” at the prompt. Type your name and organization in the box and then click “enter room.”

ATTN: TV Producers: A “bites and b-roll” package on the study launch will be available for download at 10:15 a.m. January 13, 2009 at ftp://aed-design.org. At the prompt, type:

Username: u37879245-nichd08

Password: nichd2009

Questions and interview requests after the briefing should be directed to Robert Bock or Marianne Glass Miller at the NICHD Communications Office, (301) 496-5133.

This briefing is sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health, one of the federal agencies conducting the National Children’s Study.

The NICHD sponsors research on development, before and after birth; maternal, child, and family health; reproductive biology and population issues; and medical rehabilitation. For more information, visit the Institute’s Web site at http://www.nichd.nih.gov/.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation’s Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

Embargoed for Release

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

10:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time

Contact:

Robert Bock

or Marianne Glass Miller

301-496-5133

###







National Children’s Study Begins Recruiting Volunteers

Washington, DC (Vocus) January 13, 2009

The National Institutes of Health announced today that the National Children’s Study will begin recruiting volunteers to take part in its comprehensive study of how genes and the environment interact to affect children’s health. At a briefing, NIH officials announced that the first phase of recruitment for the study will begin in Duplin County, North Carolina, and Queens, New York.

The study will track the health and development of more than 100,000 children from before birth through to their 21st birthday.

“The principal benefit of a large scale, long-term study like the National Children’s Study is that it will uncover important health information at virtually every phase of life,” said Duane Alexander, M.D., Director of NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), one of a consortium of federal agencies implementing the study. “Initially, it will provide major insights into disorders of birth and infancy, such as preterm birth and its health consequences. Ultimately it will lead to a greater understanding of adult disorders, many of which are thought to be heavily influenced by early life exposures and events. “

Dr. Alexander added that the large size and prospective nature of the study should yield information that smaller and more limited studies cannot. For example, because of the large number of individuals enrolled, the study has the capability to assess uncommon disorders, as well as how exposures to different environmental conditions and genetic factors may interact.

The National Children’s Study was authorized by Congress in the Children’s Health Act of 2000. In addition to the NICHD, other members of the consortium carrying out the study are the NIH’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

When it is fully operational, the National Children’s Study is expected to have roughly 40 study centers recruiting volunteers from 105 designated study locations throughout the United States. The study locations are counties and clusters of counties chosen by National Children’s Study researchers to be representative of children in the United States.

Of 7 initial, or Vanguard, study centers, two will be the first to recruit. This week, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will begin recruiting study volunteers from Duplin County, North Carolina. The Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York will recruit volunteers from the New York City Borough of Queens.

The centers will hold presentations and other community awareness activities in their respective locations to inform prospective volunteers. Some families in those areas will receive letters introducing the study, explained Peter Scheidt, M.D., M.P.H., Director, National Children’s Study. Prenatal care providers and clinics in the study locations will also inform women about the study.

In April of 2009, the remaining five Vanguard centers will also begin recruiting and enrolling women to participate in the study. At the end of 18 months, each center is expected to have recruited a total of approximately 375 volunteers.

A listing of the seven Vanguard center locations is available on the National Children’s Study Web site at http://www.nationalchildrensstudy.gov/about/overview/Pages/Study-Centers-Awarded-12-18-08.pdf.

Dr. Scheidt added that during this initial recruitment phase, referred to as the Vanguard cohort phase, study researchers will evaluate their recruitment and sampling methods.

“We’ll look at what we’ve accomplished, see if our recruitment efforts were sufficient, see if our sampling methods were successful, and if we’ve otherwise asked the right questions to get the information we need,” Dr. Scheidt said. “Along the way, we’ll undertake any fine tuning that we need to in preparation for further enrollment after the Vanguard cohort phase.”

The information collected during this Vanguard phase can be pooled with the data collected during later phases of the study to provide the basis for later scientific analysis.

Although the study can be expected to provide information throughout its duration, information on disorders and conditions of early life is expected within the next few years. Because the study will enroll pregnant women and, in some cases, women who are not yet pregnant, study scientists hope to identify a range of early life factors that influence later development.

“It is very exciting to reach the point at which we’re beginning enrollment and data collection,” Dr. Scheidt said. “Findings from the study will ultimately benefit all Americans by providing researchers, health care providers, and public health officials with information from which to develop prevention strategies, health and safety guidelines, and possibly new treatments and perhaps even cures for disease.”

The two Vanguard Cohort Centers will reflect the study’s representative design in their recruitment, said Dr. Barbara Entwisle, the Principal Investigator of the National Children’s Study Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

“From city streets to far-flung small towns, the two Vanguard centers will capture a broad sample that’s reflective of America’s diversity,” she said.

Dr. Entwisle explained that, unlike Queens, which is a densely populated urban area, Duplin County is a sparsely populated rural county spread out over a large area–819 square miles. Many large hog and turkey farms are located in Duplin County, as well as the factories that process them. The area also has a large Hispanic population.

There are about 800 births per year in Duplin County, approximating only a small fraction of the more than 30,000 births that occur in Queens each year, she added.

“The children in the Duplin sample will be representative of other rural areas of the U.S.,” Dr. Entwisle said.

The study location in Queens, New York, has a population of 2.23 million and is home to thousands of immigrants from more than 100 nations, said Dr. Philip Landrigan, Principal Investigator, Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.

Like many urban counties in the United States, Dr. Landrigan added, Queens is disproportionately affected by many conditions for which the National Children’s Study will help find environmental predecessors and information on the causes. For example, he said, in some parts of New York City, 1 in 4 children have asthma. In addition, one fifth of the city’s children entering kindergarten are overweight.

The NICHD sponsors research on development, before and after birth; maternal, child, and family health; reproductive biology and population issues; and medical rehabilitation. For more information, visit the Institute’s Web site at http://www.nichd.nih.gov/.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation’s Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

Contact:

Robert Bock or Marianne Glass Miller

301-496-5133

bockr(at)mail.nih.gov

###







Study Proves American Teens are at Serious Risk

New York, NY (PRWEB) January 21, 2009

The highly anticipated results of a country-wide yearlong study on teenagers and internet dangers were announced yesterday. The study, which was ordered by 49 state attorneys general, has been met with serious media buzz- as many found the findings both telling and alarming. While most U.S adults have known for years that teens face potentially dangerous situations every time they log on, the attorney general research project demonstrated that the risks presented to children online are, in fact, frighteningly similar to those they will face in the real world.

Emily Steel’s January Wall Street Journal article, “No Easy Answer for Protecting Kids Online” highlights this concerning trend among websites frequented by teenagers. Abuse, bullying, hatred and pornography crowd the internet; and no where are they more prevalent, or more dangerous, than on sites geared towards teens. According to the internet danger study, there is a serious debate over who should carry the brunt of the burden for keeping kids safe. It is a bitter tug of war between parental activist groups and web technology companies.

“Clearly, the main responsibility is on parents. (But) because technology companies are providing this gathering space and encouraging children to come, they have a duty to put in place technologies that can help protect kids.”

Attorney General Roy Cooper, North Carolina (WSJ)

So the majority of the responsibility for keeping children safe falls squarely where it always has: on a parent’s shoulders. But as today’s economic crisis forces more parents to put in extra time at work, while chat and networking websites continue to dominate the teenage social scene, there has to be a place for adults to turn for help.

As traditional internet safety and watch dog services continually fall short of their promises, concerned parents and activists have begun to seek out a more comprehensive program. Research, including the 2007-2008 attorney general study, has shown the most effective approach to be that of a fully managed internet filtering service. A parent guided, expert controlled, customizable safety net that gives adults more control, while taking some of the burden from them and keeping them informed.

Leading safety blogs like Block-Porn.Org agree with the study’s assessment, calling for new options in the battle for children’s online safety. With literally hundreds of new pornography, hatred, and gambling sites appearing every week, even the most diligent parent is likely to miss something. A recent Block- Porn blog post introduced parents to a new type of parental control: the artificial intelligence method.

No longer relegated to science fiction novels, AI is revolutionizing the way parents control what comes into their homes. These fully managed internet services, like the immensely popular My Internet Doorman (http://www.myinternetdoorman.com), let parents set the rules and boundaries, and then the experts take over the implementation process. In other words, they pick up where other services fall short. Instead of cookie cutter filters that block everything, all the time, or the easily bypassed password system, these managed services give parents the final say. Allowing certain things, blocking others- even shutting down the internet completely during certain hours provides more peace of mind for worried adults, while still allowing internet exploration for curious teens.

Internet dangers are not going anywhere. In fact, if this study is any indication, the situation is only going to get worse. The key, at least for now, is to keep the lines of communication open, while finding a service that can help you manage what your child is exposed to.

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New Study Reveals Sources of Resilience and Strength for Black Girls in New York City Black Girls Face Hardships and Challenges

New York, NY (PRWEB) March 7, 2009

A new and unique report, Black Girls in New York City: Untold Strength and Resilience, was released by the Black Women for Black Girls Giving Circle (BWBG), a funding initiative of The Twenty-First Century Foundation, and the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). The report, commissioned by BWBG from IWPR pairs analysis of original data collected through written surveys and focus groups with a review of existing literature to provide an in-depth examination into the lives of Black girls living within the city of New York.

“Through our work with Black girls as service providers, funders and technical assistance providers, it became clear to the founders of BWBG that there may be unique social factors impacting our girls,” said Stephanie Palmer, Executive Director, New York City Mission Society. “So we pooled our personal funds and joined forces with other like-minded women and organizations to conduct a study focusing on Black girls in New York City.”

The report finds that the impact of poverty is especially acute in the lives of Black girls. Approximately three-quarters of the girls in the study live in low-income communities and households.

“Like all Black children, Black girls are at increased risk of living a life of poverty. But poverty plays out in the lives of Black girls in very distinct ways,” remarked report author, Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever, affiliate scholar of IWPR and Director of the Research, Public Policy and Information Center for African American Women at the National Council of Negro Women.

eMazzanti Technologies Customer Andover Regional Schools Counts on Smart Security Solutions in New Video Case Study


Hoboken, N.J. (Vocus) December 31, 2009

A new video describing how eMazzanti Technologies helped Andover Regional Schools solve network security, reliability and budget issues is now viewable at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buB8a0eyoLQ. The video chronicles the lessons Andover learned about solving some of its most persistent computer problems.

In todays schools, technology is the students pen and paper, said Bernard T. Baggs, superintendent, Andover Regional School District. Safe, reliable network and Internet access is critical to the skills that were trying to develop.

Protecting Kids and Running a Business

eMazzanti developed a security solution utilizing WatchGuard firewall hardware along with its own proprietary eCare support package that delivers 24×7 support and maintenance for a fixed fee. Were not only responsible for the safety of the children; we also have a business to run. Both need protection. eMazzanti development a solution to meet all of our needs, continued Baggs.

Andovers Network Systems Administrator, Bill McNeir enthusiastically echoed support for the eMazzanti solution. The combination of WatchGuard hardware and eMazzantis services was a win-win for the school district. It solved bandwidth and safety issues as well as addressed budgetary constraints and the need for on-going support.

eMazzanti made sure Andover got its moneys-worth with the deployed security solution. We fixed the problems and made the solution affordable, noted Carl Mazzanti, chief operating officer, eMazzanti Technologies. Whether Andover needed to protect and maintain 300 or 1000 computers, the cost remained the same.

The Andover video case study will be featured on three main websites: eMazzanti Technologies (http://www.emazzanti.net), Andover Regional School District (http://www.andoverregional.gov) and WatchGuard (http://www.watchguard.com).

About WatchGuard

Since 1996, WatchGuard