Tag Archives: Programs

Child Foster Care Reform: National Call to Action on Children in Foster Care State Plans To Improve Nation’s Foster Care Programs and Child Protection System Unveiled

Williamsburg, VA (PRWEB) May 2, 2006

Representatives from the nations state courts and child welfare agencies have developed specific recommendations to improve child foster care systems and foster care programs throughout the country as part of a National Call to Action on children in foster care released by the National Center for State Courts (NCSC). State Supreme Court justices partnered with other state leaders to develop the National Call to Action to help reduce the length of time children spend in foster care. Their recommendations provide states with a clear road map of action plans and needed resources to improve outcomes for our nation’s children living in foster care.

Today more than 500,000 children live in foster care. Half of the children will spend at least two years in the Nations foster care system and one in five children will be in the system for five years or more. Although child foster care is often an essential step in helping abused and neglected children, state and local court delays can often extend the time between when children enter the foster care system and when they are placed in safe, permanent homes. While in this ‘limbo,’ many children and families do not receive the assistance they need to allow children to return home safely or prepare them to join another family.

“Implementation of these plans will go a long way to make substantial progress toward reducing the amount of time children spend in the foster care system,” said Chief Justice of Indiana Randall T. Shepard, President of the Conference of Chief Justices. “It will bring these children one step closer to the safe and permanent families they need and deserve.”

The National Call to Action is the result of the landmark National Judicial Leadership Summit for the Protection of Children: Changing Lives by Changing Systems (the Summit), which was held in Minnesota in September 2005. Leaders of 49 state court systems (Louisiana was unable to participate due to Hurricane Katrina), the District of Columbia and four U.S. territories participated in the Summit. As part of the Summit, each state developed an action plan to improve its child protection system procedures and programs. The NCSC, which coordinated the Summit, compiled the team plans into the National Call to Action.

“When a court case sits on the docket, a child sits in foster care,” said former Chief Justice of Minnesota Kathleen Blatz, who co-chaired the Summit.

“While foster care is supposed to be their lifeboat, for many children it’s become the Titanic. The delay in finding a permanent caring home can have a profound affect on a child,” said NCSC President Mary Campbell McQueen.

While all state action plans for child foster care system reform address specific local needs and challenges, there was considerable consensus across major areas needing improvement and the steps required to achieve these changes. Drawing on recommendations from the Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care, state teams identified the following strategies underpinning their action plans:

New Automation Technology Delivers Bigger Piece of Federal Funding Pie for Schools with Struggling Lunch Programs

Hermosa Beach, CA (PRWEB) March 27, 2008

Food Service Solutions is now offering a software for schools that will improve their means of identifying poor students, while protecting their privacy. This will enable districts to establish accurate accounting records in order to qualify for maximum state and federal funding. Studies show that many schools suffer from insufficient funding because they fail to qualify every student who is entitled to a free or discounted lunch at the school cafeteria. With this new system in place, administrators and parents can also keep track of balances and student eating habits.

Answering the question “How poor are you?” may seem unsavory. But school districts that don’t properly assess the economic status of its student populations will have no luck sweetening the pot when requesting federal and state funds. As a result, schools facing rising food costs coupled with budget shortfalls have been forced to hike school lunch prices for paying students and rely more heavily on less nutritious processed food.

Sometimes, with older accounting systems, the truth is plain as day and unintentionally segregates poor school children from the throng. For example, students might be asked to verbally declare their status in a school lunch line – within earshot of other students. Or rather than pay with cash, students eligible for assistance are issued vouchers or ID cards that, when presented at meal time, immediately identified their economic status. The embarrassment causes some students to do without food rather than be seen as less fortunate.

The older accounting system was not user-friendly either. School officials could not see personal account balances as each student went through the line as they can with the new biometric technology. Instead, to check balances, administrators would have to print out an entire list of lunch accounts at the end of the day.

Also, while the card-carrying system kept the background of each student confidential, it created other problems. On days when they did not intend to eat lunch, some students would loan their cards to friends. As a result, cards were often lost or stolen and replacing them created more work for already busy school officials.

The FSS system has succeeded, in part, because it makes laborious – and sometimes ineffective – administrative tasks so much easier. The new system also makes it easier for student and staff customers to pre-pay for meals. The system offers a good way of tracking that money. Parents can go online, via the MySchoolAccount.com feature and see when their child has eaten, and if they have money in their account. If there’s a question, they can print out an accurate statement to clarify.

This new technology speeds up the verification process of all registered students so that school lunch lines move faster. Also, since there is no need to carry cash for payment – students can pre-pay meals – no student stands out as wealthy or poor.

For more info about biometric identification systems, write to FSS Inc. at 1227 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, PA 16601; call (814) 949-2037; fax (814) 946-7572; or visit their website http://www.foodserve.com

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A Bigger Piece of Federal Funding Pie for Schools with Struggling Lunch Programs

Torrance, CA (PRWEB) August 29, 2008

Food Service Solutions is now offering a software for schools that will improve their means of identifying poor students, while protecting their privacy. This will enable districts to establish accurate accounting records in order to qualify for maximum state and federal funding. Studies show that many schools suffer from insufficient funding because they fail to qualify every student who is entitled to a free or discounted lunch at the school cafeteria. With this new system in place, administrators and parents can also keep track of balances and student eating habits.

Answering the question “How poor are you?” may seem unsavory. But school districts that don’t properly assess the economic status of its student populations will have no luck sweetening the pot when requesting federal and state funds. As a result, schools facing rising food costs coupled with budget shortfalls have been forced to hike school lunch prices for paying students and rely more heavily on less nutritious processed food.

Sometimes, with older accounting systems, the truth is plain as day and unintentionally segregates poor school children from the throng. For example, students might be asked to verbally declare their status in a school lunch line – within earshot of other students. Or rather than pay with cash, students eligible for assistance are issued vouchers or ID cards that, when presented at meal time, immediately identified their economic status. The embarrassment causes some students to do without food rather than be seen as less fortunate.

The older accounting system was not user-friendly either. School officials could not see personal account balances as each student went through the line as they can with the new biometric technology. Instead, to check balances, administrators would have to print out an entire list of lunch accounts at the end of the day.

Also, while the card-carrying system kept the background of each student confidential, it created other problems. On days when they did not intend to eat lunch, some students would loan their cards to friends. As a result, cards were often lost or stolen and replacing them created more work for already busy school officials.

The FSS system has succeeded, in part, because it makes laborious – and sometimes ineffective – administrative tasks so much easier. The new system also makes it easier for student and staff customers to pre-pay for meals. The system offers a good way of tracking that money. Parents can go online, via the MySchoolAccount.com feature and see when their child has eaten, and if they have money in their account. If there’s a question, they can print out an accurate statement to clarify.

This new technology speeds up the verification process of all registered students so that school lunch lines move faster. Also, since there is no need to carry cash for payment – students can pre-pay meals – no student stands out as wealthy or poor.

For more info about biometric identification systems, write to FSS Inc. at 1227 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, PA 16601; call (814) 949-2037; fax (814) 946-7572; or visit their website http://www.foodserve.com

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Biometrics Technology Helps Schools with Struggling Lunch Programs Get A Bigger Piece of Federal Funding Pie

Torrance, CA (PRWEB) October 10, 2008

Food Service Solutions is now offering a software for schools that will improve their means of identifying poor students, while protecting their privacy. This will enable districts to establish accurate accounting records in order to qualify for maximum state and federal funding. Studies show that many schools suffer from insufficient funding because they fail to qualify every student who is entitled to a free and reduced lunch at the school cafeteria. With this new system in place, administrators and parents can also keep track of balances and student eating habits.

Answering the question “How poor are you?” may seem unsavory. But school districts that don’t properly assess the economic status of its student populations will have no luck sweetening the pot when requesting federal and state funds. As a result, schools facing rising food costs coupled with budget shortfalls have been forced to hike food service prices for paying students and rely more heavily on less nutritious processed food.

Sometimes, with older accounting systems, the truth is plain as day and unintentionally segregates poor school children from the throng. Rather than pay with cash, students eligible for free and reduced lunch are issued vouchers or ID cards that, when presented at meal time, immediately identified their economic status. The embarrassment causes some students to do without food rather than be seen as less fortunate.

The older accounting system was not user-friendly either. School officials could not see personal account balances as each student went through the line as they can with the new biometric technology. Instead, to check balances, administrators would have to print out an entire list of lunch accounts at the end of the day.

Also, while the card-carrying system kept the background of each student confidential, it created other problems. On days when they did not intend to eat lunch, some students would loan their cards to friends. As a result, cards were often lost or stolen and replacing them created more work for already busy school officials.

The FSS biometric technology system has succeeded, in part, because it makes laborious – and sometimes ineffective – administrative tasks so much easier. The new system also makes it easier for student and staff customers to pre-pay for meals. The system offers a good way of tracking that money. Parents can go online, via the MySchoolAccount.com feature and see when their child has eaten, and if they have money in their account. If there’s a question, they can print out an accurate statement to clarify.

This new technology speeds up the verification process of all registered students so that food service lines move faster. Also, since there is no need to carry cash for payment – students can pre-pay meals – no student stands out as either eligible for free and reduced lunch or not.

For more info about biometric identification systems, write to FSS Inc. at 1227 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, PA 16601; call (814) 949-2037; fax (814) 946-7572; or visit their website http://www.foodserve.com

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The New Administration and the Judiciary, the Housing Crisis and the Law, Racism and the Legal System Explored at ABA Midyear Meeting Programs


Chicago, IL (Vocus) February 3, 2009

The housing crisis and the role of lawyers in securing housing justice; examining the psychology of prejudice; and insights into the new administration, Congress and the federal judiciary are among issues to be discussed in programs featured at the 2009 American Bar Association Midyear Meeting, Feb. 11 – 17 in Boston.

In addition to the more than 900 events at this premier gathering of legal professionals, the ABA House of Delegates will consider policies affecting the legal rights of military personnel, immigrants and the elderly; the criminal justice system treatment of juvenile sex offenders; habeas corpus petitions of detainees at the Guantanamo Navel Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; and measures that would reduce harm and litigation after catastrophes. The House meets Feb. 16 at 8 a.m. at the Hynes Convention Center, ballroom, level 3.

Also during the House meeting on Feb. 16, Presidents’ Day, will be a presentation by Walter Dellinger, Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law, Duke University, on “Abraham Lincoln as a Lawyer.”

Click here to see the full Midyear Meeting program agenda.

Among program highlights are:

“Obtaining and Retaining a Diverse Judiciary”

Issues of a lack of diversity within the judiciary, how the public perceives the judiciary based on that deficiency, and how false and unfair attacks against the judiciary have jeopardized its diversity will be discussed by panelists and audience members in an effort to develop strategies to reverse this trend.

Feb. 11, 2 p.m., Harvard Law School, 1563 Massachusetts Av., Cambridge

“Foreclosing on the American Dream: The Housing Crisis and the Role of Lawyers and Laws in Securing Housing Justice”

Families are losing their homes, often with no place to go. Innocent tenants paying their rent on time every month are being evicted on short notice when their landlords go through foreclosure. These are just some of the fallout of the housing crisis. This interactive program will focus on a hypothetical family in crisis and explore how lawyers can assist those facing such turmoil as well as ways to bolster efforts to create new affordable housing options.

Feb. 13, 8:30 a.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 308, level 3

“Mindbugs: The Psychology of Ordinary Prejudice”

Panelists will discuss how human interactions are greatly affected by implicit and unconscious biases. These biases have significant implications for all members of the legal profession, particularly women and minorities, as they impact decisions with respect to hiring, assignments, evaluations, promotions and layoffs.

Feb. 13, 10 a.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 312, level 3

“The New Administration, the New Congress and the Federal Judiciary – Judicial Appointments, Compensation, and Judicial Relations”

Join veteran Potomac insiders for key insights into what can be expected–both at the White House and in the Senate–concerning federal judicial appointments, as well as issues of judicial compensation, court-stripping, cameras in the courtroom and ethics reform.

Feb. 13, 1 p.m., Sheraton Boston, Liberty Ballroom B, 2nd level

“The Assumption of Justice: A Dialogue on Color, Ethnicity and the Courts”

Expert panelists will provide an understanding of institutional racism and the reality of disparities in the charging and sentencing of minorities in the courts. Attendees will consider ways to develop solutions within their communities.

Feb. 13, 10 a.m., Fairmont Copley Plaza, Forum Room, lower lobby level

“Health Care for Immigration Detainees: What Should be the Standard?”

Issues of detainee medical care and the adequacy, implementation and enforceability of medical standards will be addressed by panelists. Also explored will be the critical role the health care profession plays in ensuring successful service delivery, and the detainee health care system lawyers need to understand to more effectively assist their individual or institutional clients.

Feb. 13, 2 p.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 208, level 2

Implementing Health Care Reform: The Massachusetts Example”

When Massachusetts enacted an act providing access to affordable, quality, accountable health care in 2006, it undertook a comprehensive and visible effort to reform health insurance and health care practices. This panel will explore the Massachusetts experience in implementing the universal coverage mandate and the areas in which the state’s experience may or may not provide a useful model for the nation.

Feb. 13, 1:45 p.m., Fairmont Copley Plaza, State Ste. A, lower lobby level

“HIV and the Rule of Law: A Legal Roadmap for a New Administration”

Much has been done in the last eight years to address the global HIV/AIDS crisis. Yet a crisis it remains, and while billions of dollars have rightly been allocated to address the pandemic abroad, federal funds for the domestic epidemic have been flat or even cut, with potentially devastating consequences. This program will examine the domestic and international legal dimensions of HIV/AIDS and the key legal elements that must be part of the new administration’s approach. Feb. 14, 2:30 p.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 309, level 3

“Spirit of Excellence Awards”

The Spirit of Excellence Award celebrates the achievements of diverse lawyers who contribute to the legal profession and society. Awards are presented to lawyers who excel in their professional settings; who personify excellence on the national, state or local level; and who have demonstrated a commitment to racial and ethnic diversity in the legal profession. This year’s recipients include Charles J. Ogletree Jr., Jesse Climenko Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; Richard A. Soden, of counsel, Goodwin Procter LLP, Boston; Julius L. Chambers, civil rights lawyer and educator, Ferguson Stein Chambers Gresham and Sumter P.A., Charlotte, N.C.; Sen. Colleen Hanabusa, Senate president, Hawaii State Legislature, Honolulu; Joan Mei Haratani, partner, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, San Francisco; Chief Justice Daniel Sosa Jr. (Ret.), Supreme Court of the State of New Mexico, Las Cruces, N.M.; and William A. Von Hoene Jr., executive vice president and general counsel, Exelon Corporation, Chicago.

Feb. 14, noon, Sheraton Boston, Grand/Independence Ballrooms, 2nd level

“Renewed Hope: Human Rights and the New Administration”

John Shattuck, CEO, John F. Kennedy Library Foundation, and assistant secretary of state for democracy, human rights and labor under President Bill Clinton, will address how President Barack Obama can work to address concerns around the world of this nation’s commitment to human rights and the rule of law.

Feb. 16, noon, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Back Bay Ballroom D

Other programs include:

“Judicial Clerkship Program”

Feb. 12, 1 p.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 302/304, level 3

“Managing the Bailout: Execution and Oversight of the Federal Response to the Financial Crisis”

Feb. 12, 4 p.m., Suffolk University Law School, 120 Tremont St., room 285

“Recent Developments in Communications Law: Fox v. FCC”

Feb. 13, 10:45 a.m., Fairmont Copley Plaza, State Ste. B, lower lobby level

“Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiatives: Lasting Model or Historical Artifact?”

“Feb. 13, 10:45 a.m., Fairmont Copley Plaza, State Ste. A, lower lobby level

“Building a Bridge to Keeping Youth in School: Connecting Education and Legal Advocacy”

Feb. 13, 10:30 a.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 309, level 3

“Meeting the Needs of Highly Mobile Students: The Education Rights of Homeless Children and Youth and Those in the Child Welfare System”

Feb. 13, 2 p.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 309, level 3

“Women Rainmakers: Linking Public Service and Business Development”

Feb. 13, 3 p.m., Boston Marriott Copley Place, Grand Salon F, 4th floor

“Students Rights: Free Expression and Beyond,”

Feb. 13, 3:30 p.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 309, level 3

“IP Privacy in the Digital World of the Internet”

Feb 14, 10:15 a.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 208, level 2

“IP Protection of Computer Software: The State of Copyright, Patent, and License Protection for Computer Programs”

Feb. 14, 1:45 p.m., Hynes Convention Center, room 208, level 2

Online registration for news reporters wishing to cover the House of Delegates or any other function at the Midyear Meeting is easier than ever. Credential guidelines are at http://www.abanews.org/credentials.html.

For the latest information on the Meeting visit the Midyear Meeting Online Web site at http://www.abavideonews.org/ABA548/.

Accredited reporters are welcome to attend and cover all sessions for free. A press room for working journalists will be at the Hynes Convention Center, Exhibit Hall D, Level 2, starting at 8 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 12, and will remain open for on-site media registration daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The press room will close one hour after the adjournment of the House. For more information, call 312/988-6171, or 310/551-7569. From Feb. 12 – 16 call the Midyear Meeting press room at 617-954-2896.

With more than 400,000 members, the American Bar Association is the largest voluntary professional membership organization in the world. As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law.

This distribution list is a service to the news media from the American Bar Association Division for Media Relations and Communication Services. Your e-mail address will only be used within the ABA and its entities. We do not sell or rent e-mail addresses to anyone outside the ABA. To change your e-mail listing or be removed from our distribution lists, please contact the Media Relations Department at 312/988-6171

To review our privacy statement, click here.

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Talisman Programs for Children with Special Needs Launches Webinar Series to Help Parents Keep Kids Safe Online

Zirconia, NC (PRWEB) February 8, 2009

One of the nation’s leading providers of educational opportunities for special-needs students is launching a series of interactive online seminars to help parents navigate the murky waters of Internet social networking sites.

The first of these online webinars, “Facebook, My Space, My Child, Oh My,” is set for Wednesday, Feb. 25, at 7 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. Enrollment is limited to 25 participants per session, and registration is already underway.

The webinar series is sponsored by Talisman Programs, which provides summer camp and semester-length programs for young people (ages 8 to 21) who have learning disabilities, Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Asperger’s Syndrome, and high-functioning autism.

According to Aaron McGinley, who is leading Talisman’s online outreach effort, the Internet forums will explain how social networking sites work, and will provide parents with insights into the risks and benefits of popular sites such as Facebook and MySpace. They will also allow parents to ask questions and discuss issues related to raising special-needs children in an increasingly networked world.

“A lot of parents have been calling us with two questions about their kids and the Internet,” McGinley said. “They want to know how they can keep their kids safe online, and they also want to learn how to make online social networking a positive experience for their children. These webinars will help answer both of those questions.”

MAXIMIZING SAFETY, MINIMIZING RISKS

For many young people with ADHD, Asperger’s, and related conditions, social networking sites can present both a world of possibilities and a range of potential problems. The Talisman webinars, McGinley said, are designed to help parents maximize the potential of the online world while minimizing the risks that their children may encounter there.

“A lot of our students struggle with skills such as reading social cues and interpreting nonverbal body language, so it’s natural for them to be attracted to some of these online social networking sites,” McGinley said. “It can be a bit easier for them to communicate online, and also it’s a big part of mainstream youth culture. It’s something that almost every kid is doing these days.”

But the enticements and opportunities that are offered by the online world are accompanied by many of the same challenges that special-needs children face in many of their daily interactions. “Our kids typically have trouble understanding social rules,” McGinley said. “Well, there are a separate set of social rules on the Internet, and failing to understand them can lead to some serious problems.”

For example, McGinley noted, children who are prone to taking risks and making poor choices about who they associate with offline are apt to behave in a similar fashion online. But because users are often unable to control or remove images or information once they have uploaded it, the consequences of posting an embarrassing photo or sending an inappropriate message can be exponentially worse than making a social mistake in a real-world environment.

ABOUT THE WEBINARS

The first Talisman webinar will focus on the following five topics:

New Programs Offer Creative Benefits and Savings to Companies and Their Employees


Louisville, KY (PRWEB) November 19, 2009

Get Smart Benefits, LLC, a Louisville, Kentucky-based firm is opening their online benefits, services and products to employers across the country. With the launch of GetSmartBenefits.com, companies large and small can help their employees supplement insurance coverage at no cost to the employer and with significant savings to the employee.

Its a win-win service that has come at a time when we have tightened our benefits for employees in order to maintain affordable but comprehensive coverage, says Rhonda Hatfield, owner of Little Scholars Child Care. We can supplement existing insurance coverage with non-insurance benefits that include prescription discounts, 24-hour TeleDoc

Programs, Policy Lead Agenda for ABA Midyear Meeting In Orlando


Chicago (Vocus) January 13, 2010

When the American Bar Association Midyear Meeting takes place in Orlando, Fla., Feb. 4 9, ABA members will gather for hundreds of programs on such legal topics as immigration reform, court funding and diversity. Additionally, the associations House of Delegates will consider more than 35 new policy recommendations when it meets Feb. 8 9.

Headquarters for the 2010 ABA Midyear Meeting is the Walt Disney World Dolphin.

For reporters online registration is easier than ever. Credential guidelines are at http://www.abanews.org/credentials.html. Reporters also may stay updated before and during the Midyear Meeting by visiting ABANow.org.

The 555-member House of Delegates will meet on Monday and Tuesday, Feb, 8 and 9, in the Northern Hemisphere Ballroom, 5th Level, Walt Disney World Dolphin, to consider policy recommendations and vote on resolutions, including legal policy issues ranging from child welfare to worker compensation benefits, from structural reforms in courts hearing immigration cases to criminal justice reforms, from equal pay for equal work to responses to violence against women.

For details of these proposals for debate and vote during the ABA House of Delegates meeting, click here. Click on the recommendation number to read the full text and supporting report.

Among Midyear Meeting program highlights are:

Feb. 4

Not Illegal to be Young: Using the Law to Protect, Not Punish, At-Risk and Homeless Youth

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Europe 9, Lobby, 3rd Level, 1 p.m.

Alone Without an Attorney: Why Doesnt Florida (and Some Other States) Provide Lawyers to Foster Children?

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Europe 9, Lobby, 3rd Level, 3:30 p.m.

Feb. 5

More Responses to Court Funding Budget Cuts

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Southern Hemisphere I/II, 5th Level, 8:10 a.m.

The Changing Face of Discrimination: From Where Weve Been to Where Were Going in Civil Rights

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Asia 3, Lobby, 3rd Level, 8:30 a.m.

Smart Soloing: Effective Strategies for Diverse Lawyers

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Northern Hemisphere, A3, 5th Level, 12:30 p.m.

B. B. Wolf vs. Curly Pig, introduces the concept of the rule of law, giving the audience the opportunity to serve as the jury; children welcome; 4 p.m.

Walt Disney World Swan Hotel, Mockingbird 1, 1st Level

Feb. 6

Sixth Annual Summit on Indigent Defense Improvement offers a luncheon presentation, Wrongful Convictions and Other Costs of Inadequate Representation, by Barry Scheck, Co-Director of the Innocence Project at the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law as well as two panels, one on The Exonerated Efforts in Texas and Florida to Right the Wrongs and the other on Collaboration to Restore Justice

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Pacific Hall A, 1st Level, 11a.m.

Diversity on the Bench: Is the Wise Latina a Myth? asks whether judges can really check their individual identities at the courthouse door

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Northern Hemisphere A4, 5th Level, 2:30 p.m.

Accredited reporters are welcome to attend and cover all sessions for free. A press room for working journalists will be at the Walt Disney World Dolphin, Atlantic Hall C, 1st Level, starting at 8 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 4, and will remain open for on-site media registration daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The press room will close one hour after the adjournment of the ABA House of Delegates. For more information, please contact 312/988-6171, or 407/939-2914, Feb. 3 9. Credential guidelines are at http://www.abanews.org/credentials.html.

With nearly 400,000 members, the American Bar Association is the largest voluntary professional membership organization in the world. As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law.


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This distribution list is a service to the news media from the American Bar Association Division for Media Relations and Communication Services. Your e-mail address will only be used within the ABA and its entities. We do not sell or rent e-mail addresses to anyone outside the ABA. To change your e-mail listing or be removed from our distribution lists, please contact the Media Relations Department at 312/988-6171 or abanews(at)abanet(dot)org.

To review our privacy statement, click here.

Contact:

Give2Asia Partners with KNKS to Increase Donor Engagement with Anti-trafficking Programs in Cambodia

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) May 11, 2010

Cambodia is a source, transit and destination country for human trafficking. There are between 80,000 and 100,000 commercial sex workers in Cambodia, of which 30% are under 18 years old. Give2Asia, a leading U.S. philanthropic services nonprofit, and Kumar Ney Kdey Sangkheum (KNKS), a Cambodian NGO providing social services for vulnerable children, today announce a fiscal sponsor partnership, which will enable U.S. donors to improve the livelihood, health, human rights and education of Cambodian children.

According to the United Nations Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking (UNIAP), human trafficking in Cambodia has increased due to increased poverty, socio-economic imbalance between rural and urban areas, tourism, unemployment, limited education, and poor services for safe migration; poverty is the most significant cause of trafficking. KNKS promotes human rights awareness through community peer education, as well as advocacy and intervention of vulnerable women, children and their families via child rights and women protection networks at all levels.

KNKS, located in Pursat Province, Cambodia, supports the basic human rights of vulnerable children. Their support services include income generation projects, HIV/AIDS awareness education, skills training and the development of community-based self-help organizations.

The services provided by KNKS to marginalized children in Cambodia are critical to the battle against the human trafficking industry, said Ray Klinke, CFO and interim CEO of Give2Asia. Providing donor access to important causes in Asia, such as anti-human trafficking, is key to our mission.

U.S. donors can make tax-deductible donations to Give2Asia in support of KNKS at http://www.give2asia.org/knks, or by making donations to Give2Asia of cash, securities or other assets.

About Kumar Ney Kdey Sangkheum

KNKS (http://www.knkscam.org), also called the Children of Hope, is a Cambodian NGO that supports the right of vulnerable children to live in a healthy, safe and secure society, achieve an education, and develop to their full potential. KNKS works with children who are victims of sex trafficking, domestic violence, rape and other forms of abuse. Using a combination of direct service, technical assistance and advocacy, they teach basic life skills and vocational training to end the cycle of abuse. KNKS works with government agencies, local commune councils and other NGOs. They also manage a small community restaurant in Pursat town, which provides employment to the local youth and serves as a meeting place.

About Give2Asia

Give2Asia (http://www.give2asia.org) promotes charitable giving by providing personalized philanthropic services for individuals, foundations and corporations. Founded by The Asia Foundation, with more than 50 years of grantmaking experience in the Asia-Pacific region, Give2Asia helps overcome the common challenges associated with giving overseas and has made possible more than US$ 130 million in giving since launching in 2001.

Give2Asias Fiscal Sponsorship services help approved Asia-based charitable groups establish a U.S. presence, provide professional donor stewardship, and make possible tax-deductible support for Asia-based groups. Give2Asia currently provides fiscal sponsorship to over 100 charitable institutions across the Asia-Pacific region.

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The Resurgence of Gap-Year Programs: For Students Volunteering, Heres a Checklist


Gilbert, AZ (Vocus) October 29, 2010

Its an exciting trend to be sure, says Jeff Gulleson of Good Neighbor Insurance, who has helped thousands of students serving overseas. The brightest, well-to-do, but often insulated students from universities in the U.S. are going off to deliver solar power to rural India or to do statistical research on nutrition in Southern Sudan. Its now becoming so popular that some universities are actually encouraging students to defer matriculation.

But what should you know before informing your family and packing your bags?

1. Consider why you are volunteering overseas.

Is it to practice your expertise/skills, take a break from study, or discover if you want to remain in your major? Trying to pad your resume? Trying to save on tuition? Realize that volunteering overseas isnt much of a break from tuition costs, and you could work a year at home to help pay next years tuition.

2. Look for reputable help and advice either online or at your campus. (Many Gap-Year sites are geared towards Europeans. If you are a U.S. student, some things may/may not apply.)

3. Consider your budget. Be realistic and try to avoid using credit.

4. Buy good travel/health insurance. Most U.S.-based health insurance policies will not cover you overseas, and do not cover medical evacuation or canceled flights, let alone bungee jumping or getting stepped on by an elephant. For the small cost, it doesnt make sense to go without it. Good Neighbor Insurance http://www.GNInsurance.com is a reputable broker that helps students and others whether they plan to visit multiple countries or do some adventure travel along the way.

5. Protect your health. The Telegraph newspaper and other online sources, including the internationally recognized book ‘Where There is No Doctor’, offer advice to keep you from getting sick or can help mitigate the symptoms when you are far from a good hospital.

6. Learn as much as you can, listen as much as you can, be as sensitive as you can. Nothing is worse than a 20-year-old know-it-all telling locals how to tie a knot. Or organize a community. Or work their way out of poverty.

7. Decompress and debrief when you get back home. Dont immediately jump back into school. Talk to a trusted and wise friend. Consider where you struggled and have grown, as well as what you most enjoyed.

A Gap Year can be a great opportunity for students (especially from the U.S. that often are far removed from the complexities and struggles of the third-world) to serve selflessly and expand their knowledge in a way that few other experiences can match. While they may not be for everyone, a Gap Year can improve your leadership and communication skills while improving the world. Or a single childs life in the nation of Belize.

About Good Neighbor Insurance

Jeff Gulleson established Good Neighbor Insurance in 1997 to provide global health and life insurance services after working with an NGO for 30 years in Indonesia.

The staff at GNI use their expertise to help clients find good, cost-effective international health, travel, and life insurance while providing caring service based on integrity. The company serves students traveling overseas, short-term teams, aid organizations, foreign and domestic corporations, universities, and volunteers both from the U.S. and abroad. Since many have lived and worked for extended periods overseas, they have the expertise to counsel individuals, families, and groups on their international insurance needs.

Contact Information

For more information, contact Jeff Gulleson at Good Neighbor Insurance

Toll Free: 866-636-9100 or in Phoenix, AZ: 480-813-9100

Good Neighbor Insurance, 690 E. Warner Rd., Ste. 117, Gilbert, AZ 85296, USA

info(at)GNInsurance(dot)com

http://www.gninsurance.com

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