Tag Archives: Policy

Criminal Justice; Immigration; Politics in U.S. Attorney Offices; Equal Pay; Needs of Veterans, Service Members, Among ABA Policy Issues


Chicago (Vocus) January 7, 2010

The American Bar Association will address legal policy issues ranging from child welfare to worker compensation benefits, from structural reforms in courts hearing immigration cases to criminal justice reforms, from equal pay for equal work to responses to violence against women, and much more when its House of Delegates convenes Feb. 8-9 during the ABA Midyear Meeting in Orlando, Fla.

Nearly 40 proposals are listed for the House meeting. A sampling of the proposals is below, and the full list is posted here.

Proposals would:


Support a series of measures to reform legal proceedings to remove immigrants, including creating a new Article I court; improving the professionalism, independence and accountability of immigration judges; restoring review of immigration decisions to the federal judiciary; improving legal representation and information provided immigrants facing removal; and policy and procedural improvements to enhance due process and fairness in decisions to initiate, try and review immigration enforcement actions (114A, B, C, D, E, F).
Address criminal law issues involving juveniles — to limit the collateral consequences of juvenile arrests, adjudications and convictions (102A) and urge simplifying Miranda warning language for use with juvenile arrestees (102B).
Support criminal justice reforms in nonjuvenile cases — urge review and amendment of misdemeanor provisions to allow civil fines or nonmonetary civil remedies instead of such criminal penalties as fines and incarceration (102C), require pretrial conferences to work out disclosure issues in criminal cases (102D) and urge initiatives to facilitate contact and communication between parents in correctional custody and their children in the free community in appropriate cases (102E).
Support legislation to allow Legal Service Corporation grantees to assist criminal defendants and prisoners with family law and constitutional rights issues (102F).
Call on the president and the attorney general of the United States to ensure politics is not a factor in employment and prosecution decisions in the Department of Justice (102G).
Urge Congress to expand funding to cover actual national need under the John R. Justice Prosecutors and Defenders Incentive Act of 2008, a student loan repayment program for prosecutors and public defenders (102J).
Support amendments to federal student loan debt forgiveness legislation to include, with respect to married couples, income and debt for both spouses in calculating payment caps; to include military counsel among public service positions eligible for loan forgiveness, and to exclude from gross income discharges of student loans under forgiveness programs, among other proposals (113).
Adopt, and urge states and territories to adopt, a Model Act Governing Standards for the Care and Disposition of Disaster Animals, a response to the plight of pets whose owners were forced to abandon them during the Hurricane Katrina disaster (103A).
Support U.S. efforts to ensure that foreign nationals arrested in the United States are advised of their right to consult representatives of their consulate, in keeping with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations (104).
Support development of systematic approaches to meet the special needs of veterans involved in civil or criminal court proceedings through diversionary programs to connect them with housing, treatment and other services (105A).
Urge Congress to legislate more effective remedies, procedures and protections for victims of pay discrimination, including discrimination based on gender (107).
Urge Congress to reauthorize and fully fund the Violence Against Women Act (115).
Support reforms to child welfare financing laws to eliminate financial incentives to place children in foster care (110).
Urge the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to undertake measures to ensure the least possible disclosure of patients personally identifiable information contained in electronic health records, except as required by law (116).
These proposals will not constitute ABA policy unless adopted by the House. They are advocated by state and local bar associations, specialty legal groups within the ABA or affiliated with the association, and individual members, and reflect the broad range of issues confronting society. Other measures may be filed for House consideration as late as Feb. 7, while some on the agenda could be withdrawn or revised leading up to or during the House sessions.

Online registration for news reporters wishing to cover the House of Delegates or any other function at the Midyear Meeting is easier than ever. Credential guidelines are at http://www.abanews.org/credentials.html .

Accredited reporters are welcome to attend and cover all sessions for free. A press room for working journalists will be at the Walt Disney World Dolphin hotel, Atlantic Hall C, 1st level, starting at 8 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 4, and will remain open for on-site media registration daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The press room will close one hour after the adjournment of the House. For more information, call 312/988-6171. From Feb. 4 8 call the Midyear Meeting press room at 407/939-2914.

With nearly 400,000 members, the American Bar Association is the largest voluntary professional membership organization in the world. As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law.

This distribution list is a service to the news media from the American Bar Association Division for Media Relations and Communication Services. Your e-mail address will only be used within the ABA and its entities. We do not sell or rent e-mail addresses to anyone outside the ABA. To change your e-mail listing or be removed from our distribution lists, please contact the Media Relations Department at 312/988-6171 or abanews(at)abanet(dot)org.

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Programs, Policy Lead Agenda for ABA Midyear Meeting In Orlando


Chicago (Vocus) January 13, 2010

When the American Bar Association Midyear Meeting takes place in Orlando, Fla., Feb. 4 9, ABA members will gather for hundreds of programs on such legal topics as immigration reform, court funding and diversity. Additionally, the associations House of Delegates will consider more than 35 new policy recommendations when it meets Feb. 8 9.

Headquarters for the 2010 ABA Midyear Meeting is the Walt Disney World Dolphin.

For reporters online registration is easier than ever. Credential guidelines are at http://www.abanews.org/credentials.html. Reporters also may stay updated before and during the Midyear Meeting by visiting ABANow.org.

The 555-member House of Delegates will meet on Monday and Tuesday, Feb, 8 and 9, in the Northern Hemisphere Ballroom, 5th Level, Walt Disney World Dolphin, to consider policy recommendations and vote on resolutions, including legal policy issues ranging from child welfare to worker compensation benefits, from structural reforms in courts hearing immigration cases to criminal justice reforms, from equal pay for equal work to responses to violence against women.

For details of these proposals for debate and vote during the ABA House of Delegates meeting, click here. Click on the recommendation number to read the full text and supporting report.

Among Midyear Meeting program highlights are:

Feb. 4

Not Illegal to be Young: Using the Law to Protect, Not Punish, At-Risk and Homeless Youth

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Europe 9, Lobby, 3rd Level, 1 p.m.

Alone Without an Attorney: Why Doesnt Florida (and Some Other States) Provide Lawyers to Foster Children?

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Europe 9, Lobby, 3rd Level, 3:30 p.m.

Feb. 5

More Responses to Court Funding Budget Cuts

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Southern Hemisphere I/II, 5th Level, 8:10 a.m.

The Changing Face of Discrimination: From Where Weve Been to Where Were Going in Civil Rights

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Asia 3, Lobby, 3rd Level, 8:30 a.m.

Smart Soloing: Effective Strategies for Diverse Lawyers

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Northern Hemisphere, A3, 5th Level, 12:30 p.m.

B. B. Wolf vs. Curly Pig, introduces the concept of the rule of law, giving the audience the opportunity to serve as the jury; children welcome; 4 p.m.

Walt Disney World Swan Hotel, Mockingbird 1, 1st Level

Feb. 6

Sixth Annual Summit on Indigent Defense Improvement offers a luncheon presentation, Wrongful Convictions and Other Costs of Inadequate Representation, by Barry Scheck, Co-Director of the Innocence Project at the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law as well as two panels, one on The Exonerated Efforts in Texas and Florida to Right the Wrongs and the other on Collaboration to Restore Justice

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Pacific Hall A, 1st Level, 11a.m.

Diversity on the Bench: Is the Wise Latina a Myth? asks whether judges can really check their individual identities at the courthouse door

Walt Disney World Dolphin, Northern Hemisphere A4, 5th Level, 2:30 p.m.

Accredited reporters are welcome to attend and cover all sessions for free. A press room for working journalists will be at the Walt Disney World Dolphin, Atlantic Hall C, 1st Level, starting at 8 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 4, and will remain open for on-site media registration daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The press room will close one hour after the adjournment of the ABA House of Delegates. For more information, please contact 312/988-6171, or 407/939-2914, Feb. 3 9. Credential guidelines are at http://www.abanews.org/credentials.html.

With nearly 400,000 members, the American Bar Association is the largest voluntary professional membership organization in the world. As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law.


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This distribution list is a service to the news media from the American Bar Association Division for Media Relations and Communication Services. Your e-mail address will only be used within the ABA and its entities. We do not sell or rent e-mail addresses to anyone outside the ABA. To change your e-mail listing or be removed from our distribution lists, please contact the Media Relations Department at 312/988-6171 or abanews(at)abanet(dot)org.

To review our privacy statement, click here.

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Verit


Amherst, MA, and New York, NY (PRWEB) September 26, 2012

At a special session today of the Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting, President Obama announced several new Administration policies to fight human trafficking. One of these, an Executive Order Strengthening Protections in Federal Contracts, ensures that goods purchased by the U.S. Government-the largest single purchaser of goods and services in the world-are not tainted by trafficking via exploitative labor recruitment practices at any point in the production and supply chain. The Executive Order will apply to all federal contractors and subcontractors-both in the US and worldwide-and provides federal agencies with additional tools to foster compliance. This Order makes use of the key elements of the Verit

US Indian Policy as Racial Discrimination, Pacifica Radio’s Law and Disorder Program Interviews Lakota People’s Law Project’s Daniel Sheehan


Rapid City, SD (PRWEB) June 24, 2013

According to Lakota Peoples Law Project Chief Counsel Daniel Sheehan, United States policy toward Native Americans has focused on assimilation since the days of mandatory boarding schools in which children were taken from their families and tribes and were brutally forced to leave their language and customs through physical and psychological abuse. Sheehan alleges that this policy of racial discrimination and cultural destruction has continued due to widespread non-compliance with the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 which was intended to reverse US policy toward American Indians.

In an opening address to the High Plains ICWA Council meeting in Rapid City, SD, on May 15 former South Dakota senator James Abourezk who authored the Indian Child Welfare Act, stated that compliance with the letter of the law and the intent of Congress has been very poor.

A special 2012 report to Congress by the ICWA directors of the nine Lakota tribes in South Dakota confirmed information presented in a 2011 Peabody Award winning NPR expose by Laura Sullivan Native Foster Care: Lost Children, Shattered Families documenting activities that appeared to violate ICWA on a systematic basis.

The Lakota Peoples Law Project recently published a special report on the Mette Case (case # CR 10-11-13; Fifth Circuit Superior Court of South Dakota) as an alleged example on a non-ICWA compliant placement of Native Foster children outside their families and tribe. The report is titled Abandoned and Forgotten: How the State of South Dakota Punished Lakota Child Welfare Advocates and Protected Child Abusers The Mette and Taliaferro/ Schwab Cases. This is the appalling story of the placement of native children with Richard and Wendy Mette in Aberdeen, SD in an apparent violation of ICWA. The childrens complaints of physical and sexual abuse were ignored by authorities. When assistant States Attorney Brandon Taliaferro and court appointed special advocate Shirley Schwab launched an investigation which led to the arrest and indictment of the Mettes, State officials charged them with getting the children to lie about their abuse. The State gave Mette a plea agreement and Schwab and Taliaferro were exonerated by a directed verdict of acquittal in their trial before presenting their defense.

“Law and Disorder”, produced by Geoff Brady, focuses on legal issues and is hosted by the President of the Center for Constitutional Rights Michael Ratner, Heidi Boghosian Executive Director of the National Lawyers Guild and civil rights attorney Michael Steven Smith, a member of the National Lawyers Guild. Law and Disorder Radio is also syndicated on 24 terrestrial radio stations across country. Law and Disorder began airing weekly shows in 2004.

Now on contract with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, The Lakota Peoples Law Project has been partnering with tribes and leaders in South Dakota since 2005 from its offices in Rapid City, SD and Santa Cruz, CA. LPLP is providing technical support for the tribes to gain direct federal funding for the development and operation of their own child and family service programs.

The project combines public interest law, research, education, and organizing into a unique model for advocacy and social reform.

The Lakota People’s Law Project is sponsored by the non-profit Romero Institute based in Santa Cruz, California. The Institute is named after slain human rights advocate Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador. The Institute seeks to identify and dismantle structural sources of injustice and threats to the survival of our human family.