Tag Archives: Malaria

Malaria Awareness Day Offers Opportunity to Save Lives Through Nothing But Nets


(Vocus) April 3, 2007

The people of The United Methodist Church are using April 25, Malaria Awareness Day, as an opportunity to call attention to the plight of children in Africa, one of whom dies every 30 seconds from malaria.

Bishop Janice Riggle Huie, president of the denomination’s Council of Bishops, is urging members of the denomination and others to skip lunch on Malaria Awareness Day and donate the money saved to send a lifesaving mosquito bed net to a child in Africa through Nothing But Nets.

The people of The United Methodist Church are founding partners in the Nothing But Nets campaign, a grassroots effort to prevent malaria through the purchase and distribution of bed nets in Africa–soon to be featured on “American Idol.” In observance of Malaria Awareness Day, the denomination will observe the theme Skip a lunch. Send a net. Save a life.

“Bed nets are the most cost-effective way to protect children from the mosquitoes that carry this killer disease,” the Houston-based Huie said. “This is an easy, tangible way to make a difference.

“Join me,” she said. “I’m going to skip lunch and donate $ 10 to send a bed net. Skip a lunch. Send a net. Save a life.”

A $ 10 donation to http://www.NothingButNets.net will pay for the cost of a bed net, sending it to a family in Africa and teaching how it can be used to protect children from mosquitoes at night, when bites are most likely.

On April 24th and 25th, Nothing But Nets will be featured during a two-night “American Idol” special “Idol Gives Back,” designed to increase awareness and raise funds for organizations serving children living in poverty in Africa and the U.S. “American Idol” sponsors will make a donation for each vote viewers cast on April 24. On April 25, viewers will be able to make their own donations via toll-free lines and online.

Local churches are encouraged to join Malaria Awareness Day efforts by holding a noon worship service focusing on malaria on April 25 as a lunchtime alternative, or planning a fundraiser or other event to increase awareness of the disease. The United Methodist Church’s Upper Room Living Prayer Center is planning a continuous 24-hour prayer vigil for the children of Africa, for those suffering with malaria, and for global health.

United Methodists have been in mission in Africa for more than 160 years, operating hospitals, clinics, schools and mission centers.

“Nothing But Nets is a visible part of our long-term commitment to eliminate malaria,” Huie said. “Providing comprehensive health care to the developing nations of Africa is a long, difficult process. It will need to continue for generations.”

April 25 has been observed as Africa Malaria Day since 2001, but this year marks the first time President George W. Bush has proclaimed the day as Malaria Awareness Day in the United States.

Inspired by Sports Illustrated columnist Rick Reilly, the Nothing But Nets campaign has raised more than $ 4 million so far–enough money for more than 400,000 nets. A challenge grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will match contributions dollar for dollar up to $ 3 million. Other founding partners are the United Nations Foundation and the National Basketball Association’s NBA Cares.

To learn how to make a donation, visit http://www.NothingButNets.net or http://www.umc.org/nets.

Contact:

Diane Denton

(615) 742-5406 (office)

(615) 483-1765 (cell)

United Methodist Communications

Office of Public Information

810 12th Ave. S.

Nashville, TN 37203

http://www.umcpresscenter.org

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Acclaimed Producer Firdaus Kharas Fighting Malaria With Animation Campaign Initial production funding from the Canadian Red Cross

Ottawa, Canada (PRWEB) November 26, 2007

Firdaus Kharas, a multi-award winning animation producer and director, is pleased to announce the creation of animated Public Service Announcements to provide an educational tool for those trying to reduce malaria infections in Africa. Initial funding of $ 25,000 is being provided by the Canadian Red Cross to support the project.

“During my travels in Africa, I have been struck by the fact that more children die of malaria than any other disease. I want to support the efforts of organizations like the Canadian Red Cross, which help prevent malaria through massive free net distributions in Africa,” says Director and Producer Firdaus Kharas.

“My colleagues and I will create a series featuring two animated female mosquitoes that highlight the importance of using bed-nets and other educational messages to help prevent malaria in a fun and engaging way. Creating a series of world-class animated spots will provide an important tool that can be easily and widely used by broadcasters, non-governmental organizations, hospitals, schools and others to educate vulnerable communities on how to protect themselves from malaria.”

Initially five spots will be created with a total of 30 spots planned, subject to funding. The series will be provided free-of-charge to any organization requesting to use them. A comprehensive website, http://www.bednets.ca, is being developed where copies of tapes and DVDs can be requested online. This campaign builds on the success of The Three Amigos, an animated HIV/AIDS prevention campaign supported by Archbishop Desmond Tutu, with 20 spots in 41 languages currently in use in 72 countries.

“We are very pleased to be able to partner with Mr. Kharas on this important initiative to prevent malaria infections, which will greatly complement our existing malaria prevention campaigns,” says Paul Wharram, Interim Secretary General of the Canadian Red Cross. “The distribution of nets is most effective when accompanied with a strong public education component. This will be a great supporting tool for local Red Cross volunteers in Africa to use during the distributions.”

In Africa, one child dies every 30 seconds from malaria. Each year, between 350 million and 500 million people are infected with malaria around the world. Even though malaria is preventable and treatable, it currently threatens over 40 per cent of the world’s population. The majority of deaths from malaria are young children and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa. There is no vaccine against malaria; the best defence is prevention.

Firdaus Kharas:

Firdaus Kharas has been publicly acknowledged as a “world renowned” director and producer of animation, film and television media. His current work focuses on creating various types of media to affect societal and individual behavioural change through mass communications. These media initiatives have a universal appeal in that they span many cultures and countries to better the human condition.

In the last three years, Mr. Kharas’ media work has garnered 60 international awards. These include the Peabody, CINE Golden Eagle, Telly, Platinum Remi, Chris, Hugo, Golden Reel, Gold World Medal in New York and First Prize at the Chicago International Children’s Festival.

Mr. Kharas, who is Ottawa-based, owns and operates Chocolate Moose Media Inc. Further information can be found at http://www.kharas.ca. The Three Amigos HIV/AIDS Prevention Programme site is http://www.thethreeamigos.org.

The Canadian Red Cross:

The Canadian Red Cross works with Red Cross Societies in Africa to provide nets free-of-charge in some of the world’s most malaria-affected countries. Red Cross has delivered more than three million nets directly to families in Togo, Sierra Leone, Zambia, Niger, Mozambique, Malawi and Madagascar, thanks to the generous support of the Canadian International Development Agency and Canadian donors.

Canadians wishing to support the Campaign Against Malaria are encouraged to donate online at http://www.malariabites.net, calling toll-free 1-800-418-1111 or by contacting their local Canadian Red Cross office. Cheques should be made payable to the Canadian Red Cross, earmarked “Campaign Against Malaria” and mailed to the Canadian Red Cross National Office, 170 Metcalfe Street, Suite 300; Ottawa, Ontario; K2P 2P2.

The Canadian Red Cross is a member of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, which includes the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the International Committee of the Red Cross and 185 national Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. Its mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity in Canada and around the world.

For additional information and interviews, please contact:

Kita Szpak, KS Communications.

Tel: (1) 613-798-8333 or (1) 613-725-3063

Canadian Red Cross Media Line

1 (613) 740-1994

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WHO World Malaria Report Shows Aid Efforts Are Working

Washington, DC (PRWEB) December 17, 2009

According to the World Health Organization’s World Malaria Report 2009 released earlier this week, more than one third of affected countries included in the study have witnessed reduction in malaria cases by more than 50 percent between 2000 and 2008. The report, which compiles information gathered from malaria programs in 108 countries, highlights considerable progress in the fight against malaria since the turn of the decade.

These improvements are attributed to a vast increase in international funding for malaria efforts over the past four years, which more than doubled from $ 730 million to $ 1.7 billion. However, malaria advocates in Washington cautioned that unless funding continues to increase, programs will fall well short of 2010 targets for universal coverage with insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) and the United Nations Millennium Development Goals in 2015. According to the Global Malaria Action Plan, $ 6.2 billion is needed in 2010 alone to fully fund the package of malaria interventions necessary to meet the Roll Back Malaria goals that will save the lives of mothers and children worldwide.

“Malaria is one of the best investments we have in global health,” said Rear Admiral Tim Ziemer, the U.S. Malaria Coordinator. “We must build on successes we have seen in places like Rwanda, Zambia and Zanzibar, where effective partnership and proven tools like insecticide-treated mosquito nets, spraying of homes with safe, effective insecticides and malaria diagnosis and treatment worked together to dramatically reduce deaths and illness. And as we continue to make progress in the fight against malaria, we make important gains toward meeting the Millennium Development Goals related to poverty reduction, child survival, maternal health and reducing malaria deaths.”

Bolstered by the new data from WHO, malaria advocates in the U.S. have requested that the U.S. government allocate $ 924 million for bilateral malaria funding; $ 200 million for research, development and technical assistance; and $ 1.75 billion for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in appropriations for fiscal year 2011. Advocates also applauded the ongoing commitment of the Obama Administration and Congress to expand malaria programming, demonstrated by the recent approval of $ 585 million for bilateral assistance for malaria and an additional $ 1.05 billion in support of the Global Fund.

The United States remains a global leader in the fight against malaria. Last year alone, the President’s Malaria Initiative reached 32 million people with lifesaving prevention or treatment services, while direct funding from the U.S. has helped the Global Fund distribute 104 million ITNs to protect families and provide treatment to 74 million individuals suffering with malaria.

Visit the World Health Organization’s Web site for more information on the World Malaria Report 2009.

This effort sponsored collectively by the following malaria community partners:

Development Finance International

Global Health Council

Johns Hopkins University Center for Communication Programs

Malaria No More

PSI

Syngenta

World Vision

Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria

American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

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Real Salt Lake Teams Up with Nothing But Nets to Fight Malaria


Washington, DC (Vocus) June 4, 2010

Major League Soccers (MLS) Real Salt Lake and the United Nations Foundations Nothing But Nets campaign are teaming up to raise awareness about malaria. As the winner of last years MLS Cup, the club will meet with President Obama on Friday, June 4. The club will host a workshop to engage D.C.-area children in the global fight against malariaa preventable and treatable disease that continues to kill nearly 1 million people each year.

Winning the MLS Cup was an incredible victory; we look forward to saying the same about malaria in 5 years, said Real Salt Lake defender Robbie Russell. To know that a child dies every 30 seconds from a preventable disease is hard to understand, but its easy to help. Were excited to be part of building the movement to end malaria.

MLS W.O.R.K.S., Major League Soccers community outreach initiative, has been connecting its teams, players, and fans to send nets and save lives through Nothing But Nets since 2007. Since 2006, hundreds of thousands of supporters have helped Nothing But Nets raise more than $ 30 million to send more than 3 million life-saving bed nets to Africa.

As part of a country-wide bus tour to spread the buzz about saving lives by ending malaria, the Nothing But Nets Buzz Tour is working with MLS teams across the country to host in-stadium events to raise awareness about malaria in the lead up to the 2010 World Cup, which will be played in Africa for the first timewhere 90 percent of malaria deaths occur.

Long-lasting, insecticide-treated bed nets are one of the easiest and most cost-effective methods of preventing the spread of the disease. The nets create a protective barrier against mosquitoes at night, when the vast majority of malaria transmissions occur. One bed net can protect a family of four, and lasts three to five years. A net costs just $ 10 to purchase, deliver, and educate the recipient on its proper use.

About Nothing But Nets

Nothing But Nets is a global, grassroots campaign to save lives by preventing malaria, a leading killer of children in Africa. Inspired by sports columnist Rick Reilly, hundreds of thousands of people have joined the campaign that was created by the United Nations Foundation in 2006. Founding campaign partners include the National Basketball Associations NBA Cares, The people of The United Methodist Church, and Sports Illustrated. It only costs $ 10 to provide an insecticide-treated bed net that can prevent this deadly disease. Visit http://www.NothingButNets.net to send a net and save a life.

About MLS W.O.R.K.S.

MLS W.O.R.K.S. is Major League Soccer’s community outreach initiative dedicated to addressing important social issues affecting young people and serves as a platform for League and club philanthropic programs. MLS W.O.R.K.S. seeks to establish Major League Soccer as a leader for improving the lives of people through sport. For more information visit the website at http://www.MLSsoccer.com/works

Media Contact:

Negin Janati, United Nations Foundation, (202) 378-7858; njanati (at) unfoundation (dot) org

Sean Dennison, Major League Soccer, (917) 658-4159; sean.dennison (at) mlsnet (dot) com

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New Report Shows Investment in Malaria Prevention Paying Off: Hundreds Of Thousands Of Children’s Lives Saved

Washington DC (PRWEB) September 14, 2010

A new report confirms that the current global investment in malaria control is saving lives and that further increases in funding will contribute significantly to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for health.

Saving Lives with Malaria Control: Counting Down to the Millennium Development Goals – authored by Tulane University, Johns Hopkins University, WHO, and PATH and published today by the Roll Back Malaria Partnership (RBM) – reveals that the lives of almost three quarters of a million children in 34 African countries are estimated to have been saved in the past 10 years, through the use of insecticide treated mosquito nets, indoor residual spraying, and preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy.

The report estimates that an additional 3 million lives could be saved by 2015 if the world continues to increase investment in tackling the disease.

Malaria causes over 850,000 deaths per year worldwide, the majority of deaths in Africa where the disease accounts for almost 20% of all child deaths. Malaria also threatens the health of pregnant women. In sub-Saharan Africa, as many as 10,000 pregnant women die each year of malaria-related causes, mainly anemia.

Massive increases in the availability of insecticide treated nets have been recorded in the last few years. However, directly measuring the impact of insecticide nets, treatments, and other malaria control efforts is difficult as health information systems remain weak and the majority of malaria deaths are not properly recorded.

The Lives Saved Tool (LiST) – developed to be used across major childhood diseases – is being applied to malaria prevention across Africa. The report provides the first assessment of lives saved based on the level of coverage achieved with currently available malaria prevention tools. Although this does not include data on lives saved from diagnosis and treatment, and is likely to be an underestimate, the results show just how much progress has been made.

“The findings from this report clearly show the efficacy of our efforts to save lives, especially among children in Africa,” says Professor Awa Coll Seck, RBM Partnership Executive Director. “This is a vital tool which can help strengthen country planning and guide us all as we focus on 2015.”

Findings from the report also show that the number of rural households protected by either insecticide-treated nets or indoor residual spraying has increased significantly, especially in the latter half of this decade. The report estimates that malaria funding in 2010 could result in 500 more children alive every day.

“This report demonstrates the critical importance of malaria control efforts to reaching the health-related Millennium Development Goals by 2015” states Dr. Robert Newman, director of the Global Malaria Program at WHO. “Without continued investment in malaria, reaching the MDG for child survival is unlikely to be reached in Africa.”

“While we’ve made great progress, much work remains,” said Rear Admiral (Ret.) Tim Ziemer, U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator. “To reach the Millennium Development Goals, we must accelerate our efforts to expand not only malaria prevention and treatment, but also a broad range of community-based health services. The Administration’s Global Health Initiative is helping partner countries achieve major advances through innovation, integration, and improved health service delivery in countries.”

Progress made in controlling malaria is still very fragile. The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the largest funder of malaria control programs worldwide, will hold its third replenishment meeting in November 2010, where governments will make financial pledges which may well determine if the malaria-related MDGs can be achieved.

About Roll Back Malaria

Saving Lives with Malaria Control: Counting Down to the Millennium Development Goals is the third in the Progress & Impact Series of reports published by the RBM Partnership. The Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership is the global framework for coordinated action against malaria. It provides a neutral platform for consensus-building and developing solutions to challenges in the implementation of malaria control interventions and strategies. RBM is a public-private partnership that also facilitates the incubation of new ideas and lends support to innovative approaches.

The Partnership promotes high-level political commitment and keeps malaria high on the global agenda by enabling, harmonizing and amplifying partner-driven advocacy initiatives. Founded by UNICEF, WHO, the World Bank, and UNDP and strengthened by the expertise, resources, and commitment of more than 500 partner organizations, the Partnership secures policy guidance and financial and technical support for control efforts in countries and monitors progress towards universal goals.

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Lutheran World Relief, The Lutheran ChurchMissouri Synod and United Nations Foundation Announce $45 Million Campaign to Fight Malaria

Detroit, MI (PRWEB) June 30, 2011

Lutheran World Relief(LWR), The Lutheran ChurchMissouri Synod (LCMS) and the United Nations (UN) Foundation announced on Monday an unprecedented partnership to mobilize Lutherans in the United States in the fight against malaria in Africa.

The campaign, called the Lutheran Malaria Initiative (LMI), aims to raise $ 45 million to contribute toward the global goal of eliminating malaria deaths in Africa by 2015. Malaria, a preventable and treatable disease, continues to devastate communities and perpetuate a cycle of poverty. According to the World Health Organization, nearly 1 million people die of malaria each year and every 45 seconds a child dies in Africa. In many communities where LWR and the LCMS work, extreme poverty creates conditions that allow malaria to take hold and spread with deadly consequence.

At a news conference held Monday at Detroits Historic Trinity Lutheran Church, leaders of the LMI partnership joined representatives from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund), to announce the campaign and discuss the crucial role of churches and faith-based institutions in the effort to end malaria deaths.

Rev. John Nunes, president and CEO of Lutheran World Relief, opened the news conference. I am excited to be here today with the LMI partners, Nunes said. This is a day that has been years in the making, and for which millions around the world have been waiting.

Dr. Matthew C. Harrison, president of The Lutheran ChurchMissouri Synod, spoke next. The Lutheran footprint for providing care and mercy to those suffering is enormous, Harrison said. For decades, we have been working with partners and fellow Lutherans at the end of the dirt road. Today, we are delighted to come alongside the LMI partners to take a huge bite out of this horrid disease.

Gloria Edwards, co-chair of the LMI National Campaign Cabinet, offered insights on her inspiration for becoming involved in the initiative. My husband and I believe in saying yes to the open doors God places before us, she said. We went to East Africa not long ago and saw a young woman in a malaria-induced coma. We also saw other young children who demonstrated how to use a bed net, and how to let their parents know when they are not feeling well so that they can be taken to the doctor. We are excited to be a part of helping more children and families know how to prevent malaria as well as what to do when they get sick with the disease.

In closing the news conference, Nicolas Demey, corporate partnerships officer with the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, said, It is an honor to work with LMI to help end malaria deaths in Africa. We have the tools and know what we need to do to end these needless deaths. We can do it.

Following Mondays news conference, Kathy Calvin, CEO of the UN Foundation, added: Between 40 percent and 60 percent of health care in developing countries is provided by faith-based organizations, like our Lutheran partners, Calvin said. It is inspiring to see how the Lutheran community in the U.S. can help the UN reach families in rural villages on the other side of the world.

The news conference is available online at http://www.youtube.com/lutheranmalariavideo.

Lutheran World Relief (LWR)

Lutheran World Relief is an international nonprofit organization that works to end poverty and injustice by empowering some of the worlds most impoverished communities to help themselves. With partners around the world, LWR seeks to promote sustainable development with justice and dignity by helping communities bring about change for healthy, safe and secure lives; engage in Fair Trade; promote peace and reconciliation; and respond to emergencies. LWR is headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, and has worked in international development and relief since 1945.

LWR is a ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), The Lutheran ChurchMissouri Synod (LCMS), individuals and parish groups in international relief, development, advocacy, and social responsibility.

The Lutheran ChurchMissouri Synod (LCMS)

The Lutheran ChurchMissouri Synod is a mission-oriented, Bible-based, confessional Christian denomination headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri. Founded in 1847, the church body, which ranks as one of the largest Christian denominations in the United States, has more than 2.3 million baptized members in some 6,200 congregations and more than 9,000 pastors. In addition, the LCMS owns and operates KFUO radio, two seminaries, and 10 colleges and universities. Its congregations operate the largest Protestant parochial school system in America.

The LCMS has relationships and active mission work in some 88 countries around the world and, in the last five years, has awarded more than $ 35 million through more than 900 domestic and international grants for emergency response and disaster relief. Today, the LCMS is in full doctrinal fellowship with 33 other confessional Lutheran church bodies worldwide and is a founding partner of Lutheran Services in America, a social ministry organization serving one in every 50 Americans.

The United Nations Foundation (UN Foundation)

The United Nations Foundation, a public charity, was created in 1998 with entrepreneur and philanthropist Ted Turners historic $ 1 billion gift to support UN causes and activities. The UN Foundation is an advocate for the UN and a platform for connecting people, ideas and resources to help the UN solve global problems. They build partnerships, grow constituencies, mobilize resources and advocate policy changes to support the UNs work for individual and global progress. The Foundations workfocused on select global problemsis decreasing child mortality, improving disaster relief, protecting diverse cultures and environments, creating a clean energy future, empowering women and girls, and improving U.S.-UN relations.

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (The Global Fund)

The Global Fund is a unique, public-private partnership and international financing institution dedicated to attracting and disbursing additional resources to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS, TB and malaria. This partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and affected communities represents an innovative approach to international health financing. The Global Funds model is based on the concepts of country ownership and performance-based funding, which means that people in countries implement their own programs based on their priorities and the Global Fund provides financing on the condition that verifiable results are achieved.

Since its creation in 2002, the Global Fund has become the main financier of programs to fight AIDS, TB and malaria, with approved funding of US$ 21.7 billion for more than 600 programs in 150 countries (as of December 2010). The Global Fund works in close collaboration with other bilateral and multilateral organizations to supplement existing efforts in dealing with the three diseases.

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Concordia University, Nebraska Students Fight the Night to Help Stop Malaria

Seward, NE (PRWEB) September 16, 2012

On Sept. 28 many Concordia University, Nebraska students will give up the comfort of their beds and sleep outside to provide a bed net to someone at risk of contracting malaria in another part of the world. The night under the stars will be the capstone of a Fight the Night event, a project that kicks off a Lutheran Malaria Initiative campaign on Concordias campus.

Earlier that evening, all are invited to enjoy food, music and entertainment in the quad at the center of campus. Admission to the event is $ 10, the cost to provide a bed net for one child in need.

Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite. Bed nets are the fastest way to prevent malaria infection because they create a protective barrier against mosquitoes at night, when the vast majority of transmissions occur.

It is not very often that we have the chance to directly affect the life of someone who lives on the other side of the world, and all we have to do is sleep outside and if you ask me, thats the best part! said Alyssa McAfee, a junior from Grand Island, Neb.

Planned activities include live music performed by campus bands, an IMPROVables comedy show and the much-anticipated Pie your Professor game. St. John Lutheran Church will provide fruit and baked goods while Our Redeemer Lutheran Church will provide hot chocolate during the event. Those wishing to participate should bring tents and sleeping bags; bed nets will be provided for those who wish to sleep under one for the night.

The event is part of an effort to raise $ 25,000 through student and donor support at Concordia. Donations will go directly to the LMI, which works in Sub-Saharan Africa to end malaria. So far the campus has raised more than $ 11,000 for the cause.

People with malaria often experience fever, chills and flu-like illness. Left untreated, they may develop severe complications and die. In 2010, an estimated 216 million cases of malaria occurred worldwide and 655,000 people died. More than ninety percent of those deaths occurred in Africa, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To make a donation to the Lutheran Malaria Initiative and Concordias fundraising goal, visit lutheranmalaria.org and click the LMI Universities tab near the top of the page; then click on Concordia University, Nebraska.

Concordia University, Nebraska, founded in 1894, is a fully accredited, coeducational university located in Seward, Neb. that currently serves over 2,200 students. Concordia offers more than 50 professional and liberal arts programs in an excellent academic and Christ-centered community that equips men and women for lives of learning, service and leadership in the church and world. For more information, visit cune.edu.