Tag Archives: Funding

Acclaimed Producer Firdaus Kharas Fighting Malaria With Animation Campaign Initial production funding from the Canadian Red Cross

Ottawa, Canada (PRWEB) November 26, 2007

Firdaus Kharas, a multi-award winning animation producer and director, is pleased to announce the creation of animated Public Service Announcements to provide an educational tool for those trying to reduce malaria infections in Africa. Initial funding of $ 25,000 is being provided by the Canadian Red Cross to support the project.

“During my travels in Africa, I have been struck by the fact that more children die of malaria than any other disease. I want to support the efforts of organizations like the Canadian Red Cross, which help prevent malaria through massive free net distributions in Africa,” says Director and Producer Firdaus Kharas.

“My colleagues and I will create a series featuring two animated female mosquitoes that highlight the importance of using bed-nets and other educational messages to help prevent malaria in a fun and engaging way. Creating a series of world-class animated spots will provide an important tool that can be easily and widely used by broadcasters, non-governmental organizations, hospitals, schools and others to educate vulnerable communities on how to protect themselves from malaria.”

Initially five spots will be created with a total of 30 spots planned, subject to funding. The series will be provided free-of-charge to any organization requesting to use them. A comprehensive website, http://www.bednets.ca, is being developed where copies of tapes and DVDs can be requested online. This campaign builds on the success of The Three Amigos, an animated HIV/AIDS prevention campaign supported by Archbishop Desmond Tutu, with 20 spots in 41 languages currently in use in 72 countries.

“We are very pleased to be able to partner with Mr. Kharas on this important initiative to prevent malaria infections, which will greatly complement our existing malaria prevention campaigns,” says Paul Wharram, Interim Secretary General of the Canadian Red Cross. “The distribution of nets is most effective when accompanied with a strong public education component. This will be a great supporting tool for local Red Cross volunteers in Africa to use during the distributions.”

In Africa, one child dies every 30 seconds from malaria. Each year, between 350 million and 500 million people are infected with malaria around the world. Even though malaria is preventable and treatable, it currently threatens over 40 per cent of the world’s population. The majority of deaths from malaria are young children and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa. There is no vaccine against malaria; the best defence is prevention.

Firdaus Kharas:

Firdaus Kharas has been publicly acknowledged as a “world renowned” director and producer of animation, film and television media. His current work focuses on creating various types of media to affect societal and individual behavioural change through mass communications. These media initiatives have a universal appeal in that they span many cultures and countries to better the human condition.

In the last three years, Mr. Kharas’ media work has garnered 60 international awards. These include the Peabody, CINE Golden Eagle, Telly, Platinum Remi, Chris, Hugo, Golden Reel, Gold World Medal in New York and First Prize at the Chicago International Children’s Festival.

Mr. Kharas, who is Ottawa-based, owns and operates Chocolate Moose Media Inc. Further information can be found at http://www.kharas.ca. The Three Amigos HIV/AIDS Prevention Programme site is http://www.thethreeamigos.org.

The Canadian Red Cross:

The Canadian Red Cross works with Red Cross Societies in Africa to provide nets free-of-charge in some of the world’s most malaria-affected countries. Red Cross has delivered more than three million nets directly to families in Togo, Sierra Leone, Zambia, Niger, Mozambique, Malawi and Madagascar, thanks to the generous support of the Canadian International Development Agency and Canadian donors.

Canadians wishing to support the Campaign Against Malaria are encouraged to donate online at http://www.malariabites.net, calling toll-free 1-800-418-1111 or by contacting their local Canadian Red Cross office. Cheques should be made payable to the Canadian Red Cross, earmarked “Campaign Against Malaria” and mailed to the Canadian Red Cross National Office, 170 Metcalfe Street, Suite 300; Ottawa, Ontario; K2P 2P2.

The Canadian Red Cross is a member of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, which includes the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the International Committee of the Red Cross and 185 national Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. Its mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity in Canada and around the world.

For additional information and interviews, please contact:

Kita Szpak, KS Communications.

Tel: (1) 613-798-8333 or (1) 613-725-3063

Canadian Red Cross Media Line

1 (613) 740-1994

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New Automation Technology Delivers Bigger Piece of Federal Funding Pie for Schools with Struggling Lunch Programs

Hermosa Beach, CA (PRWEB) March 27, 2008

Food Service Solutions is now offering a software for schools that will improve their means of identifying poor students, while protecting their privacy. This will enable districts to establish accurate accounting records in order to qualify for maximum state and federal funding. Studies show that many schools suffer from insufficient funding because they fail to qualify every student who is entitled to a free or discounted lunch at the school cafeteria. With this new system in place, administrators and parents can also keep track of balances and student eating habits.

Answering the question “How poor are you?” may seem unsavory. But school districts that don’t properly assess the economic status of its student populations will have no luck sweetening the pot when requesting federal and state funds. As a result, schools facing rising food costs coupled with budget shortfalls have been forced to hike school lunch prices for paying students and rely more heavily on less nutritious processed food.

Sometimes, with older accounting systems, the truth is plain as day and unintentionally segregates poor school children from the throng. For example, students might be asked to verbally declare their status in a school lunch line – within earshot of other students. Or rather than pay with cash, students eligible for assistance are issued vouchers or ID cards that, when presented at meal time, immediately identified their economic status. The embarrassment causes some students to do without food rather than be seen as less fortunate.

The older accounting system was not user-friendly either. School officials could not see personal account balances as each student went through the line as they can with the new biometric technology. Instead, to check balances, administrators would have to print out an entire list of lunch accounts at the end of the day.

Also, while the card-carrying system kept the background of each student confidential, it created other problems. On days when they did not intend to eat lunch, some students would loan their cards to friends. As a result, cards were often lost or stolen and replacing them created more work for already busy school officials.

The FSS system has succeeded, in part, because it makes laborious – and sometimes ineffective – administrative tasks so much easier. The new system also makes it easier for student and staff customers to pre-pay for meals. The system offers a good way of tracking that money. Parents can go online, via the MySchoolAccount.com feature and see when their child has eaten, and if they have money in their account. If there’s a question, they can print out an accurate statement to clarify.

This new technology speeds up the verification process of all registered students so that school lunch lines move faster. Also, since there is no need to carry cash for payment – students can pre-pay meals – no student stands out as wealthy or poor.

For more info about biometric identification systems, write to FSS Inc. at 1227 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, PA 16601; call (814) 949-2037; fax (814) 946-7572; or visit their website http://www.foodserve.com

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A Bigger Piece of Federal Funding Pie for Schools with Struggling Lunch Programs

Torrance, CA (PRWEB) August 29, 2008

Food Service Solutions is now offering a software for schools that will improve their means of identifying poor students, while protecting their privacy. This will enable districts to establish accurate accounting records in order to qualify for maximum state and federal funding. Studies show that many schools suffer from insufficient funding because they fail to qualify every student who is entitled to a free or discounted lunch at the school cafeteria. With this new system in place, administrators and parents can also keep track of balances and student eating habits.

Answering the question “How poor are you?” may seem unsavory. But school districts that don’t properly assess the economic status of its student populations will have no luck sweetening the pot when requesting federal and state funds. As a result, schools facing rising food costs coupled with budget shortfalls have been forced to hike school lunch prices for paying students and rely more heavily on less nutritious processed food.

Sometimes, with older accounting systems, the truth is plain as day and unintentionally segregates poor school children from the throng. For example, students might be asked to verbally declare their status in a school lunch line – within earshot of other students. Or rather than pay with cash, students eligible for assistance are issued vouchers or ID cards that, when presented at meal time, immediately identified their economic status. The embarrassment causes some students to do without food rather than be seen as less fortunate.

The older accounting system was not user-friendly either. School officials could not see personal account balances as each student went through the line as they can with the new biometric technology. Instead, to check balances, administrators would have to print out an entire list of lunch accounts at the end of the day.

Also, while the card-carrying system kept the background of each student confidential, it created other problems. On days when they did not intend to eat lunch, some students would loan their cards to friends. As a result, cards were often lost or stolen and replacing them created more work for already busy school officials.

The FSS system has succeeded, in part, because it makes laborious – and sometimes ineffective – administrative tasks so much easier. The new system also makes it easier for student and staff customers to pre-pay for meals. The system offers a good way of tracking that money. Parents can go online, via the MySchoolAccount.com feature and see when their child has eaten, and if they have money in their account. If there’s a question, they can print out an accurate statement to clarify.

This new technology speeds up the verification process of all registered students so that school lunch lines move faster. Also, since there is no need to carry cash for payment – students can pre-pay meals – no student stands out as wealthy or poor.

For more info about biometric identification systems, write to FSS Inc. at 1227 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, PA 16601; call (814) 949-2037; fax (814) 946-7572; or visit their website http://www.foodserve.com

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Biometrics Technology Helps Schools with Struggling Lunch Programs Get A Bigger Piece of Federal Funding Pie

Torrance, CA (PRWEB) October 10, 2008

Food Service Solutions is now offering a software for schools that will improve their means of identifying poor students, while protecting their privacy. This will enable districts to establish accurate accounting records in order to qualify for maximum state and federal funding. Studies show that many schools suffer from insufficient funding because they fail to qualify every student who is entitled to a free and reduced lunch at the school cafeteria. With this new system in place, administrators and parents can also keep track of balances and student eating habits.

Answering the question “How poor are you?” may seem unsavory. But school districts that don’t properly assess the economic status of its student populations will have no luck sweetening the pot when requesting federal and state funds. As a result, schools facing rising food costs coupled with budget shortfalls have been forced to hike food service prices for paying students and rely more heavily on less nutritious processed food.

Sometimes, with older accounting systems, the truth is plain as day and unintentionally segregates poor school children from the throng. Rather than pay with cash, students eligible for free and reduced lunch are issued vouchers or ID cards that, when presented at meal time, immediately identified their economic status. The embarrassment causes some students to do without food rather than be seen as less fortunate.

The older accounting system was not user-friendly either. School officials could not see personal account balances as each student went through the line as they can with the new biometric technology. Instead, to check balances, administrators would have to print out an entire list of lunch accounts at the end of the day.

Also, while the card-carrying system kept the background of each student confidential, it created other problems. On days when they did not intend to eat lunch, some students would loan their cards to friends. As a result, cards were often lost or stolen and replacing them created more work for already busy school officials.

The FSS biometric technology system has succeeded, in part, because it makes laborious – and sometimes ineffective – administrative tasks so much easier. The new system also makes it easier for student and staff customers to pre-pay for meals. The system offers a good way of tracking that money. Parents can go online, via the MySchoolAccount.com feature and see when their child has eaten, and if they have money in their account. If there’s a question, they can print out an accurate statement to clarify.

This new technology speeds up the verification process of all registered students so that food service lines move faster. Also, since there is no need to carry cash for payment – students can pre-pay meals – no student stands out as either eligible for free and reduced lunch or not.

For more info about biometric identification systems, write to FSS Inc. at 1227 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, PA 16601; call (814) 949-2037; fax (814) 946-7572; or visit their website http://www.foodserve.com

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Struggling Schools Report A Bigger Piece of Federal Funding Pie

Torrance, CA (PRWEB) December 9, 2008

Struggling school districts are capitalizing on a system that helps to improve their means of identifying poor students, while protecting their privacy. This is enabling districts to establish accurate accounting records in order to qualify for maximum state and federal funding.

Recent studies have shown that schools suffer from insufficient funding when they fail to qualify every student who is entitled to a free and reduced lunch at the school cafeteria. With this new system in place, administrators and parents can also keep track of balances and student eating habits.

The new biometric identification technology from Food Service Solutions (FSS) of Altoona, Pennsylvania speeds up the verification process of all registered students so that food service lines move faster. Also, since there is no need to carry cash for payment — students can pre-pay meals — no student stands out as either eligible for free and reduced lunch or not.

The FSS biometric technology system has succeeded, in part, because it makes laborious — and sometimes ineffective — administrative tasks so much easier. The new system also makes it easier for student and staff customers to pre-pay for meals. The system offers a good way of tracking that money. Parents can go online, via the MySchoolAccount.com feature and see when their child has eaten, and if they have money in their account. If there’s a question, they can print out an accurate statement to clarify.

Sometimes, with older accounting systems, the truth is plain as day and unintentionally segregates poor school children from the throng. Rather than pay with cash, students eligible for free and reduced lunch are issued vouchers or ID cards that, when presented at meal time, immediately identified their economic status. The embarrassment causes some students to do without food rather than be seen as less fortunate.

The older accounting system was not user-friendly either. School officials could not see personal account balances as each student went through the line as they can with the new biometric technology. Instead, to check balances, administrators would have to print out an entire list of lunch accounts at the end of the day.

Also, while the card-carrying system kept the background of each student confidential, it created other problems. On days when they did not intend to eat lunch, some students would loan their cards to friends. As a result, cards were often lost or stolen and replacing them created more work for already busy school officials.

Answering the question “How poor are you?” may seem unsavory. But school districts that don’t properly assess the economic status of its student populations will have no luck sweetening the pot when requesting federal and state funds. As a result, schools facing rising food costs coupled with budget shortfalls have been forced to hike food service prices for paying students and rely more heavily on less nutritious processed food.

For more information contact:

Robert Gray

rgray at foodserve dot com

FSS Inc.

Altoona, PA 16601;

Phone: (814) 949-2037

Fax (814) 946-7572

http://www.foodserve.com

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Grant Funding Available “Feed More Kids”

Torrance, CA (PRWEB) February 10, 2009

The board of directors at Food Service Solutions, the industry leader in lunchroom POS technology, answered the demand of school districts nationwide to increase the “Feed More Kids” grant funding. This will open the door to even more schools across the country who dream of maximizing funding from their free and reduced lunch program running an automated point-of-purchase system.

Struggling School Districts are capitalizing on software that helps to improve their means of identifying poor students, while protecting their privacy. This is enabling districts to establish accurate accounting records in order to qualify for maximum state and federal public school funding and charter school funding.

Recent studies have shown that schools suffer from insufficient funding when they fail to qualify every student who is entitled to a free and reduced lunch at the school cafeteria. With this new system in place, administrators and parents can also keep track of balances and student eating habits.

Sometimes, with older accounting systems, the truth is plain as day and unintentionally segregates poor school children from the throng. Rather than pay with cash, students eligible for free and reduced lunch are issued vouchers or ID cards that, when presented at meal time, immediately identified their economic status. The embarrassment causes some students to do without food rather than be seen as less fortunate.

The older accounting system was not user-friendly either. School officials could not see personal account balances as each student went through the line as they can with the new biometric technology. Instead, to check balances, administrators would have to print out an entire list of lunch accounts at the end of the day.

Also, while the card-carrying system kept the background of each student confidential, it created other problems. On days when they did not intend to eat lunch, some students would loan their cards to friends. As a result, cards were often lost or stolen and replacing them created more work for already busy school officials.

The FSS biometric technology system that helps increase public school funding and charter school funding has succeeded, in part, because it makes laborious – and sometimes ineffective – administrative tasks so much easier. The new system also makes it easier for student and staff customers to pre-pay for meals. The system offers a good way of tracking that money. Parents can go online, via the MySchoolAccount.com feature and see when their child has eaten, and if they have money in their account. If there’s a question, they can print out an accurate statement to clarify.

In addition to ensuring a greater share of public school funding and charter school funding, this new technology speeds up the verification process of all registered students so that food service lines move faster as well as eliminates the social stigma sometimes associated with free and reduced lunch qualification. Also, since there is no need to carry cash for payment – students can pre-pay meals – no student stands out as either eligible for free and reduced lunch or not.

For more information contact:

Robert Gray

FSS Inc.

Altoona, PA 16601;

Phone: (814) 949-2037

Fax (814) 946-7572

http://www.foodserve.com

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ABA Midyear Meeting Agenda Features Discussions on Immigration Reform, Funding Crisis Facing Courts and the Changing Face of Discrimination


Chicago, IL (Vocus) January 27, 2010

As comprehensive immigration reform looms on the legislative horizon, the American Bar Association will examine recommendations to enhance immigration courts while improving the professionalism, independence and accountability of immigration court judges during the associations 2010 Midyear Meeting, Feb. 3 – 9, in Orlando, Fla.

Indigent defense system improvements, access to care for HIV/AIDS patients, the funding crisis facing state and local courts, the changing face of discrimination and diversity on the bench are among other topics that ABA members will discuss.

With top-quality legal programs and events, along with presentations by the countrys foremost law experts and speakers, the ABA Midyear Meeting is one of the nations most significant gatherings of legal professionals.

The 555-member House of Delegates will meet on Feb. 8 and 9 in the Northern Hemisphere Ballroom, 5th Level, Walt Disney World Dolphin, to consider policy recommendations and to vote on resolutions. Among the policy recommendations that the House of Delegates will discuss are support for a series of measures that would reform legal proceedings to remove immigrants and support for criminal justice reforms in non-juvenile cases.

Other proposals urge states and territories to adopt a Model Act Governing Standards for the Care and Disposition of Disaster Animals; urge Congress to legislate more effective remedies, procedures and protections for victims of pay discrimination, including discrimination based on gender; and support child welfare financing law reforms to eliminate financial incentives for placing children in foster care.

Details on these and all recommendations are available at the ABA House of Delegates Web site. Follow activities at the Midyear Meeting at http://www.abanow.org.

Highlights of the 2010 ABA Midyear Meeting include:

Fifth HIV/AIDS Law and Practice Conference:

Speakers include Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Christopher Bates, director, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office of HIV/AIDS Policy;

Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director, American Public Health Association; Dr. Barry Zukerman, founding director of the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership; Frances Ashe-Goins, director, Office of Womens Health, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services; and

Janet Cleveland, deputy director, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control.

Feb. 3 and Feb. 4, Walt Disney World Dolphin, Asia 1 Lobby/3rd Level

A full listing of the programs is available at the AIDS conference site: http://www.abanet.org/AIDS/conferences/2010/home.htm.

Not Illegal to be Young: Using the Law to Protect, Not Punish, at-Risk and Homeless Youth:

This panel will discuss legal ways of helping young people who find themselves homeless.

Feb. 4, 1 p.m., Walt Disney World Dolphin, Europe 5, Lobby/3rd Level

State Budgets, Court Funding and Access to Justice: Sobering Facts and Tentative Solutions:

State court funding has been dramatically impacted by the economic downturn, resulting in what the New York Times has called a tangible narrowing of access to justice. This discussion will look at the positive steps state and local bar leaders are taking to address this situation.

Feb. 5, 8:30 a.m., Walt Disney World Dolphin, Convention Foyer 3, Lobby/3rd Level

The Changing Face of Discrimination: From Where Weve Been to Where Were Going in Civil Rights:

This program will explore how the Civil Rights Act was intended to address discrimination and how current discrimination issues fit into that statute.

Feb. 5, 8:30 a.m., Asia 3, Lobby/3rd Level

Smart Soloing: Effective Strategies for Diverse Lawyers:

This program is designed to help new solo/small firm lawyers build the skills needed to run a successful practice and will address strategies that minority and women practitioners can use to overcome barriers, to capitalize on opportunities and to develop a support network.

Feb. 5, 12:30 p.m., Northern Hemisphere A3, 5th Level

Prosecuting and Defending Immigration-Based Criminal Offenses: What Prosecutors and Defense Attorneys Should Know:

In many cases, numbers of non-citizens are facing prosecution in criminal courts. In some instances, these offensives are immigration-based crimes such as fraudulent passports or false claims to citizenship. This session will discuss how to examine an A-File and how a particular court result will affect immigration status.

Feb. 5, 1 p.m., Walt Disney World Swan, Swan Ballroom 2, 1st Level

Hot Off the Press: A Call for Reform of the Immigration Adjudication System:

This panel will include leading immigration advocates and scholars from across the country, including Miami-based staff attorney Debbie Lee, co-director of the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center.

Feb. 5, 3 p.m., Promenade Salon IV, Ground Level, Disney’s Boardwalk Inn

Wrongful Convictions and Other Costs of Inadequate Representation:

Barry Scheck, co-founder and co-director of the Innocence Project at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, will deliver the keynote address during the luncheon at the Sixth Annual Indigent Defense Improvement Summit.

Feb. 6, 12:30 p.m., Walt Disney World Dolphin, 1st Level, Pacific Hall A

The 5000-Year-Old Formula: Negotiation From Moses to Next Monday Morning The Rules Havent Changed:

Based on Lee Hetheringtons innovative law school course on negotiation, this program will provide a practical framework designed for lawyers engaged in deal making and in settling disputes.

Feb. 6, 1 p.m., Walt Disney World Dolphin, 5th Level, Northern Hemisphere A2

Diversity on the Bench: Is the Wise Latina a Myth?:

A growing number of studies are demonstrating the impact of a judges gender or ethnicity in certain types of cases. The studies underscore the importance of diversity on the bench. This panel looks at the new research as well as suggests what can be done to promote accuracy, fairness, consistency and predictability in judicial decision-making.

Feb. 6, 2:30 p.m., Walt Disney World Dolphin, Northern Hemisphere A4, 5th Level

Reporters with ABA credentials are welcome to attend and cover all sessions for free by obtaining credentials in the full-service Press Room in the Walt Disney World Dolphin, Atlantic Hall C, 1st Level, starting at 8 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 4. The Press Room will remain open for onsite media registration from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily and will close one hour after the adjournment of the House of Delegates on Feb. 9. Credential guidelines are online at http://www.abanet.org/media/credentials.html. Reporters also can complete registration online. The on-site Press Room phone number is 407/939-2914.

With nearly 400,000 members, the American Bar Association is the largest voluntary professional membership organization in the world. As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law.

This distribution list is a service to the news media from the American Bar Association Division for Media Relations and Communication Services. Your e-mail address will only be used within the ABA and its entities. We do not sell or rent e-mail addresses to anyone outside the ABA. To change your e-mail listing or be removed from our distribution lists, please contact the Media Relations Department at 312/988-6171 or abanews(at)abanet(dot)org.

Pennsylvania EPA Awards Abington Memorial Hospital Funding for Green Projects


Abington, PA (Vocus) February 6, 2010

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection-Office of Energy and Technology Development has awarded two grants to Abington Memorial Hospital in support of its efforts to “Think Green.

Three million dollars was awarded to Abington Memorial Hospital for a new cogeneration system to replace the hospitals 45-year-old heating system. This new system will save over $ 2 million a year in energy costs, and significantly reduce air contaminants and water usage. It will generate 38 million kilowatt hours on-site, roughly 64 percent of the hospitals electricity needs, while producing steam as a byproduct.

A $ 250,000 grant was awarded for the replacement of inefficient lighting technology with proven efficient long-lasting fluorescent tube technology in four parking garages at the hospitals main campus. Calculated savings include a reduction in electricity usage of 53 percent with accompanying emissions at the same rate.

“As a non-profit, we do as much environmentally conscious work as we can with very little budgeted dollars, says Meg McGoldrick, chief operating officer and member of the hospitals “Green Team. “These grants are a real shot in the arm for our green efforts. McGoldrick said State Representative Josh Shapiro was a strong advocate for the hospitals grant applications.

Shapiro says he is proud to have been able to help secure these grants to create 79 green jobs and reduce energy consumption and emissions in his district. “These grants will help boost our local economy and reduce the amount of air contaminants in our air and water sources, and decrease the hospitals demand for electricity, says Shapiro. “I commend Abington Memorial Hospital for their commitment to clean up our environment and energy efficiency.

In October 2006, the Pennsylvania EPA recognized Abington Memorial Hospital by presenting it with the Trailblazer Award for the hospitals environmental leadership in taking positive steps to reduce waste, improve indoor air quality and invest in reusable rather than disposable products.

For more information about Abington Memorial Hospitals green initiatives, please visit http://www.amh.org/ThinkGreen.

About Abington Memorial Hospital

Abington Memorial Hospital is a 665-bed, acute care teaching hospital with a medical staff of more than 900 physicians and 5,600 employees. These professionals provide medical care and health services to residents of Bucks, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties.

A regional provider, Abington Memorial Hospital has the only Level II accredited trauma center in Montgomery County and offers highly specialized services in cardiac care, cancer care, neurosciences, orthopaedics and maternal/child health.

Contact:

Linda Millevoi

215-481-8966

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Funding Flexibility Helps Keep Florida Children Safe and Out of Foster Care — Children’s Home Society Recommends Expansion of Successful Model


Winter Park, FL (PRWEB) August 31, 2010

On behalf of the National Crittenton Foundation, Childrens Home Society of Florida (CHS) President and CEO David Bundy participated in a work session of the Senate Foster Care Caucus on August 27 to describe how Floridas flexible funding demonstration program has achieved record success in finding adoptive families for foster care children, while ensuring more children are kept safely with their own families and out of foster care. Without natural or adoptive families, foster youth who age out of care are less likely to earn high school diplomas or GEDs, and more likely to experience unemployment, homelessness, teen pregnancy or incarceration.

Based on Floridas success, Bundy recommends the extension of Florida’s critical, Title IV-E flexible funding beyond September 30, 2011, and the expansion of the flexible funding model so all states have the ability to implement the type of changes seen in Florida. Further, Bundy urges Congress to consider fundamental reform in the financing of child welfare through alignment of funding to reduce administrative costs and the replacement of eligibility linkages with funding based on a childs need. Additional recommendations include provision of technical assistance to states, creation of a clearinghouse for innovative practices and identification of new ways to increase flexibility in funding.

Foster care should be only a temporary protection for children and the ultimate goal must be stable, permanent homes for all children, Bundy said. Foster youth age out of care at age 18 in Florida and between 19 and 21 in other states We must raise awareness of and promote solutions for these older children who leave foster care and find themselves without support.

Since 1998, more than 200,000 young people nationwide have aged out of foster care. Many would have been able to stay safely with their own families had flexible funding existed to allow the delivery of services that specifically addressed their families’ challenges. Today, 463,000 children in America are in the foster care system.

Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley and Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu established the Senate Caucus on Foster Youth to provide a forum to increase awareness of foster care, generate ideas for preventing negative outcomes and create opportunities for success for older youth in foster care.

About Children’s Home Society of Florida

Created in 1902, Children’s Home Society of Florida (CHS) is the second-largest private not-for-profit in the United States and Canada accredited by the Council on Accreditation and is the oldest statewide provider of services to children and families in Florida. CHS services include foster care, adoption, child abuse prevention, emergency shelters, residential group homes, independent and transitional living for teens, parent education, counseling, mentoring, and treatment for developmentally disabled children.

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iPredator Inc. Announces 2013 Internet Safety Seed Funding Opportunity


Hudson Valley, NY (PRWEB) November 28, 2012

Unlike human predators prior to the Information Age, iPredators rely on the multitude of benefits offered by Information and Communications Technology (ICT.) Malevolent in intent, iPredators rely on their capacity to deceive and harm others using ICT in an abstract electronic universe. New York State licensed psychologist and certified forensic consultant, Dr. Michael Nuccitelli, is in the final stages of completing his Internet safety and Tech. Predator awareness website.

After 3 years of extensive research and growing recognition of his technological predator construct, iPredator, Dr. Nuccitelli and iPredator Inc. announces their 2013 Internet safety seed funding investment opportunity for corporate entities and investors.

Educators, parents, businesses and all citizens must treat iPredators as a societally toxic phenomenon. To thwart this growing epidemic, it is paramount the United States and global community immediately initiate an awareness and educational campaign. This campaign must be aimed at preventing children, adults and commerce from being targeted and victimized through the use of ICT. To initiate this vital first step, iPredator Inc. is offering a seed funding investment opportunity to corporate entities and investors.

As stated by Dr. Nuccitelli, Ive spent 3 long and obsessed years developing iPredator and all my products, services and national awareness building strategies. Whether the seed funding comes from a corporate entity, investor, for profit or not for profit organization, the mission is to plant a seed of fear in the minds of criminals, deviants, abusers & terrorists who use ICT to victimize others. Central to their strategy, the definition of Dr. Nuccitellis construct, iPredator, is as follows:

iPredator: A child, adult or group who, directly or indirectly, engages in exploitation, victimization, stalking, theft or disparagement of others using Information and Communications Technology (ICT.) iPredators are driven by deviant fantasies, desires for power and control, retribution, religious fanaticism, political reprisal, psychiatric illness, perceptual distortions, peer acceptance or personal and financial gain.

iPredators can be any age, either gender and not bound by economic status, race or national heritage. Whether the offender is a cyberbully, cyber stalker, cyber harasser, cyber-criminal, online sexual predator, internet troll or cyber terrorist, they fall within the scope of iPredator.

In the 2011 winter issue of the Forensic Examiner, Dr. Nuccitellis theoretical construct, iPredator, was the feature article. Published by the largest professional forensics education organization in the world, American College of Forensic Examiners International, CEO & founder, Robert OBlock, endorsed Dr. Nuccitellis theory and national educational strategy in November, 2012. In addition to his theory, Dr. Nuccitelli has designed 26 cyber-attack risk assessments, data collection and educational tools for purchase, in which 13 of them can be taken online. These checklists and inventories assess the risk potential of a child, adult or business being targeted by an iPredator.

From a services perspective, Dr. Nuccitelli has developed an innovative advisory based cyber-attack prevention membership service called, iPredator Protected. Similar in structure to car owners who are AAA members offered by the Automobile Association of America, the iPredator Protection membership service gives consumers immediate access to experts trained in identification, intervention, apprehension and prosecution of iPredators.

iPredator Inc. also offers a variety of educational, training and speaking engagement services that can be performed in person or via web conferencing sites. Lastly, iPredator Inc. can assist law enforcement, court systems and other public safety arenas investigation and iPredator profiling services.

As stated by Tina Church, chief ICT investigator and iPredator Inc. partner, It is almost 2013 and society has thrived within the Information Age for over three decades. Is it going to take another three decades before people open their eyes to the victimization of children and vulnerable adults in cyberspace?