Tag Archives: Console

Part 1: New Jersey Car Accident Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Warn of Teen Drinking & Driving in Recognition of National Teen Driver Safety Week


Marlton, New Jersey (PRWEB) October 15, 2012

October 14 through the 20th marks National Teen Driver Safety Week and in observance of this, the Toms River car accident attorneys at Console & Hollawell want all parents and teens to be aware of safe driving practices that could save your life. Console & Hollawell is doing a five-part series in honor of this national service:

The Personal Injury Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Urge Parents to be Diligent with Protecting Their Children at Home


Marlton, NJ (PRWEB) December 03, 2012

Parents, of course, always want what is best for their children, especially when it comes to protecting them from dangers. Despite this, almost 9,000,000 children 19 and younger are injured and 9,000 die as the result of these injuries, many of which could have been prevented, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).* Preventable injuries can occur almost anywhere: at the grocery store, while driving in a car, and even in your own home. While you may not be able to control the actions of other motorists or ensure that a retail establishment is free of hazards, you can do your part in preventing injuries within your house. That is why the New Jersey attorneys at Console & Hollawell, who have handled thousands of cases involving injuries to children, are urging all parents to be aware of the dangers that may be lurking just down your hallway.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recently reported that this year they have already received reports of approximately 500 incidents where a child or adult was injured due to single-use laundry detergent packets.** These injuries most often stemmed from the detergent having contact with the eyes or due to consumption. The CPSC explained that since the packets are soluble in water, they can easily break open if a child puts the packet in their mouth or if their hands are wet when handling the packet. Some of the chemicals within the packet are toxic and consumption has left children experiencing extreme vomiting, loss of consciousness, breathing difficulty, fatigue, and swelling of the throat.

Richard P. Console, Jr., managing partner at the firm, feels that while parents are aware that certain items at home need to be kept from their children, it sometimes is so apparent that it is often overlooked.

Parents know that cleaning supplies, including laundry detergents, contain toxic chemicalsor at least they should, Console said. It boils down to not expecting that their children would attempt to eat these detergent pods and that if they did attempt, the parent would be able to stop them in time. Unfortunately, since the outer layer holding the detergent dissolves in liquid, the child need only mistake the packet for candy or a teething ring for one second before tragedy occurs.

Everyone should be aware of the dangers many household products can pose should they be congested, yet every day in the United States more than 300 children are treated in emergency rooms because of poisoning, according to the CDC.* Parents must make a strong effort to prevent accidents that can result in injuries at home in any way they can.

It would be irresponsible to assume that your child knows not to play with or attempt to consume products that could be harmful to them, Console said. The only way to ensure that these injuries do not befall your children is to keep these items stored where the kids cannot access them such as a high shelf or locked cabinet.

The injury attorneys at Console & Hollawell, P.C. have been protecting the rights of accident victims since 1994. They have seen firsthand what the effects of an accident in the home can cause and they remind all that if a child consumes these detergent packets to immediately contact the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Poison Help at (800) 222-1222 or online at poisonhelp.hrsa.gov.

*http://www.cdc.gov/safechild/

**http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/390.pdf