Life with Teens Magazine Highlights the Steps to Prevent Teen Concussions

Boston, MA (PRWEB) March 31, 2013

TeenLife Media, a print and online media company that offers comprehensive information and resources for parents and teenagers features the article Getting A-Head of Concussions in the spring issue of Life with Teens magazine. It provides excellent tips for parents and teenagers on the preventative measures on and off of the field when engaging in sports.

“Spring is the perfect time for everyone to become more active, but also more safe. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as many as 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related concussions occur in the United States each year. But many more get undetected or unreported. That’s why, we feel that it is so important to educate parents and teens today on what to look for if a head injury occurs,” states Marie Schwartz, Founder of TeenLife Media, LLC.

Experts say most youths do well after a sports-related concussionas long as they leave play immediately, seek medical care, and let their brains heal before returning to the field, rink, or court. Children who sustain repeat concussions are at risk for life-changing problems, including brain damage, even death.

Here are some steps parents and athletes can take to help prevent concussions while enjoying youth sports:

Play smart. Athletes should follow the coachs safety rules, practice good sportsmanship, and wear correct protective equipment (helmets, padding, etc.) that fits and is well maintained.

Get strong. There is evidence that neck and shoulder strengthening can help athletes stabilize their heads after an impact, notes William Meehan, M.D., director of the Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention and the Sports Concussion Clinic at Boston Childrens Hospital. He also recommends staying hyperaware (keep your head on a swivel) during play.

Study up. Know the signs and symptoms, which may not appear until hours or days after an injury. Remember that concussions rarely involve losing consciousness; even a ding to the head can be serious. Also, familiarize yourself with your school or league concussion policiesincluding whether they conduct preseason neurocognitive tests like ImPACT to measure an athletes memory, concentration, and reaction times.

See a doctor. If you suspect a concussion, get medical help right away. A primary care physician with experience managing head injuries is a good place to start, but see a specialist if symptoms worsen.

Be patient. Resting the body and brain after a concussion is critical. Students should not return to play or school until cleared by a medical professional. Recoverymeaning all symptoms are gone (both while resting and exercising) and balance and brain function are restoredtypically takes 7 to 10 days.

Communicate. Let coaches know if your teen has had previous head injuries in any sport. And if your child complains about concussion-type symptoms, take that seriously.

About Life with Teens magazine:

Life with Teens magazine (http://www.teenlife.com/LifewithTeens) is published by TeenLife Media, LLC, the go to source for parents, educators, and teenagers nationwide who are seeking programs and services for college-bound students in grades 7 – 12. Our award-winning website, e-newsletters, specialized guides, and signature events feature thousands of enrichment opportunities that bring out the best in teenagers. These include summer programs, community service opportunities, academic experiences, and gap year programs regionally, nationally and abroad. Access to all of TeenLife’s resources is free for registered parents, educators and students at http://www.teenlife.com.

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